Los Angeles Review of Books
Dark Corners of Our Everyday Lives
April 24th, 2017, 01:00 PM

ALEX SEGURA’S LATEST NOVEL, Dangerous Ends, opens in 1959 Cuba with someone refusing a deal from Che Guevara. That act of dissent sets off a series of violent, terrifying events. Segura is no stranger to a high-stakes story — the previous book of his Pete Fernandez series found the private investigator chasing a serial killer. […]

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The Other F-Word: On History, Memory, and Experiments in Armenian-Turkish Conciliation
April 24th, 2017, 01:00 PM

IT WAS LATE APRIL in the Capital, a time of blossoming cherries, daffodils, and other imported botanical cheer. The annual White House Easter egg hunt had recently passed — as, incidentally, had the 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act. Washington, DC was in particular good form, enjoying the spoils of its imports and […]

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The Girls Finale
April 24th, 2017, 01:00 PM

Dear TV says goodbye to GIRLS...

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Histories of Violence: Breaking the World
April 24th, 2017, 01:00 PM

THIS IS THE SEVENTH in a series of dialogues with artists, writers, and critical thinkers on the question of violence. This discussion is with the renowned and widely celebrated Yugoslavia-born performance artist Marina Abramović. ¤ ADRIAN PARR: I have always been intrigued by the ways in which your body occupies space and time and how […]

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The Slide Rule and the Crowbar: Henry David Thoreau in the Anthropocene
April 23rd, 2017, 01:00 PM

IN 1704, a mill dam was built in Billerica, Massachusetts, on the banks of the Concord River. It was a small dam, but the social ripples it sent intensified over the course of 150 years, especially after 1798, when the mill and its dam were sold to a group of early capitalists, who raised the […]

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An Interview with Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
April 23rd, 2017, 01:00 PM

NGŨGĨ WA THIONG’O is a world-renowned Kenyan writer, scholar, and social activist. Ngũgĩ’s diverse body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, articles, essays, and poems, which have been translated into over 60 languages. A Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at UC Irvine, he has received numerous awards and 11 honorary doctorates. Ngũgĩ refers to […]

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The Two-Bodied King of “Richard II” and Its Trumpian Delusion
April 23rd, 2017, 01:00 PM

AT LEAST DONALD TRUMP has made America read again. Soaring sales of Plato’s Republic and George Orwell’s 1984 prove that Americans are turning to literature for insight into what’s happening to us. In honor of Shakespeare’s birthday, we should not overlook the King Richard II as the kind of literature that can help us find our bearings. Richard II is about the connection between personal […]

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In Contagious Mood: Notes on Claude McKay’s New, Last Novel “Amiable with Big Teeth”
April 22nd, 2017, 01:00 PM

RED MOODS, black moods, golden moods. Curious, syncopated slipping-over into one mood, back-sliding back to the first mood. Humming in harmony, barbaric harmony, joy-drunk, chasing out the shadow of the moment before. The most astonishing passage in Claude McKay’s first novel, Home to Harlem, is not about any one character but the spectrum of moods […]

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Sages and Holy Fools
April 22nd, 2017, 01:00 PM

WHAT JASON M. WIRTH likes about Milan Kundera is that the Czech writer prefers fog to absolutes. His “universe of the novel” is concerned less with ideal theories and abstractions than with the complex suchness of things. Like all great writers, Kundera celebrates the ambiguity of human existence — the epiphanies of the everyday. The […]

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“Literature with a Capital L”: On Arthur Krystal’s “This Thing We Call Literature”
April 22nd, 2017, 01:00 PM

TRY AS HE MIGHT, Arthur Krystal can’t help but write elegiacally. His subjects are writing and reading, once acknowledged as practices central to being a thoughtful, reasonably well-educated person, and now the objects of casual disparagement and neglect, threatened with slow extinction. An unapologetically bookish (though seldom pedantic) fellow, Krystal does his damnedest to sound […]

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