Sydney Review of Books
Six Degrees from the City: Episode 2 – Felicity Castagna
October 19th, 2017, 05:31 PM

 Six Degrees from the City is a podcast about writing in Western Sydney, hosted by the writer and critic Fiona Wright. In each episode features a writer based in or hailing from the western suburbs of Sydney, one of the most diverse – as well as most maligned – areas in Australia, and the site […]

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Made Things: Jeff VanderMeer’s Borne
October 17th, 2017, 05:31 PM

As I was writing this essay news came through that a Russian tanker had crossed the high Arctic without an icebreaker. Even a decade ago it was unthinkable this might happen before the middle of the century, yet the Arctic ice has retreated so much faster than expected that some scientists are predicting the Arctic […]

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Brother to Children: A Case Study
October 16th, 2017, 05:31 PM

Note: This essay contains material about the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse that some readers may find disturbing.  The brothers built their school at the base of a valley. The primary school block was constructed first, the Marist monastery soon after, and the secondary college last. Along the perimeter they planted European […]

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Letter from Iceland
October 12th, 2017, 05:31 PM

On the door of Grái Kötturinn cafe is the painted face of a grey cat with green eyes. It grins awkwardly, its crooked white whiskers etched into the paint in thin lines like scratches. Although I had my eye out for the Grái Kötturinn, I almost missed it as I walked down Hverfisgata, the street […]

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The Joy and Misery of Cybersex
October 10th, 2017, 05:31 PM

It is a day when compulsion is getting the better of me. I have plenty of work to do, and a clear list written, setting out my day, task by task. But after breakfast, I spend too much time checking emails and Twitter in that first crucial hour, and so, throughout the rest of the […]

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Rae Desmond Jones (1941-2017): ‘The fractured poetry / of commerce and power’
October 9th, 2017, 05:31 PM

Rae Desmond Jones has stated that for him poetry and politics are mutually contradictory pursuits, yet his poetry, concerned with how people and classes interact, is, like all art, necessarily political. Poems explore, often comically, types of capital, and its deployment of power, from the cruising ‘sharks’ in the street menacing bypassers, to teacher-student relationships […]

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Oracles and the Intellect: James McAuley in the Centenary of his Birth
October 5th, 2017, 05:31 PM

‘It was a pretty idle afternoon in Victoria Barracks’, McAuley would later say. ‘I suppose we must have started about lunchtime.’ What followed is well known. In October 1943 two young poets, James McAuley and Harold Stewart created the fictitious poet Ern Malley, whose slim manuscript of surreal poems, The Darkening Ecliptic, they sent to […]

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Noise and Voice: An Interview with Amanda Stewart
October 2nd, 2017, 05:31 PM

Amanda Stewart is a poet, author and composer/performer. As well as writing poetry, she is interested in expanding poetic notions to other forms and has worked extensively in new music, radio, film, theatre, dance, sound poetry and new media environments. Some of her poetry utilises more traditional literary devices while other works aim to make […]

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Did It Really Happen?: Picnic at Hanging Rock
September 28th, 2017, 05:31 PM

Joan Lindsay’s Picnic at Hanging Rock, which turns fifty this year, owes a share of its longevity to the modern folklore of vanished white women that has swirled around sites like Hanging Rock in Victoria’s Macedon Ranges since the nineteenth century. Lindsay’s Gothic legend still clings to this unique rock formation. The tale’s enduring appeal […]

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Hot Links: Hypertext and George P. Landow
September 25th, 2017, 05:31 PM

It was probably late and we had certainly been drinking. The conversation turned to – guest stars from M.A.S.H.? One-hit wonders of the 80s? The fictional biography of the Fonz? The actual biography of Henry Winkler? Something. This was the mid 1990s, and we could, in theory, have dialled up and posted a question on […]

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