Sydney Review of Books
8 Turner Street, Redfern
June 26th, 2017, 10:51 PM

I was reluctant to try share house living again; being thrown out of the Abercrombie Street house had affected me more deeply than I thought. My room in the Harold Park Hotel wasn’t a viable option either. It wasn’t the quality of the room that was the problem. When I first went to check the […]

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Semiologists Beware
June 22nd, 2017, 10:51 PM

On the afternoon of 25 February 1980, Roland Barthes was run over by a delivery van in the Rue des Écoles in Paris, just in front of an extraordinary institution, the Collège the France, a place where luminaries like Barthes deliver lectures to the world at large on all manner of recondite topics, free of […]

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2017 Emerging Critics Fellowships
June 19th, 2017, 10:51 PM

The Sydney Review of Books invites applications for the 2017 CA-SRB Emerging Critics Fellowships. Applications close on 25 July 2017. At the Sydney Review of Books we publish the best critics in the country; our writers move freely between genres and across national boundaries and as they do so, they map the changing terrain of […]

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Good Grief
June 19th, 2017, 10:51 PM

American literature does not lack for accomplished short-story writers, but few have achieved the prized double of critical acclaim and commercial success on the level currently enjoyed by George Saunders. This is remarkable in itself, but even more so when one considers that his fiction is often lauded for its singularity. ‘Some writers work within […]

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John Clarke: A Postscript
June 15th, 2017, 10:51 PM

It was the day that Seamus Heaney died: August 30, 2013. I hadn’t seen John Clarke since the late 1970s. More than three decades earlier, we had met in the hallways of Radio Triple J in Darlinghurst, when I was half of a young singing duo and he was a fresh-faced Fred Dagg. Now, both […]

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Elemental Mysteries
June 13th, 2017, 10:51 PM

When she began publishing fiction in the 1980s, Beverley Farmer was part of a rising generation of women writers adding their voices to the record of Australian life. She was seen as a woman of modern multicultural Australia who had married one of the new Greek immigrants and experienced the contrast of cultures between Old […]

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A Kaleidoscope of Experience
June 8th, 2017, 10:51 PM

The first poem by Peter Boyle I ever read happens to be a useful precursor to the work he does in Ghostspeaking. The poem is ‘Nine ways of writing an American Poem’, which appeared in the book What the Painter Saw in our Faces (2001). In this poem, Boyle mimics different trends in American poetics, […]

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An Anthropocene Tale and its Writer
June 5th, 2017, 10:51 PM

‘I won’t live to see it, but you will!’ If spoken now, these words might be addressed by a baby boomer to a millenial. In fact they were said to me some thirty years ago. The speaker was the Australian novelist and critic George Turner. He was a small, wiry, olive-skinned man, his eyes merry […]

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A Half Century of One Hundred Years of Solitude
June 4th, 2017, 10:51 PM

It was in June 1967 – one of the iciest months ever recorded in Buenos Aires – that Argentinian readers first encountered an unforgettable sentence: ‘Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendia was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.’ So begins Gabriel García […]

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One Hundred Years of Solitude
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Slipstream Dreams
June 1st, 2017, 10:51 PM

Two new works of Australian speculative fiction were on my mind when 2016 was declared the hottest year on record, after the world’s meteorological agencies had said the same for the previous year and the one before that. People under thirty have never experienced a month in which average temperatures are below the long-term mean. […]

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