Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Roaming imagination: What the stories we tell about bears say about us
November 21st, 2017, 07:59 AM
Bears hold a powerful place in the human psyche. At the heart of our obsession are contradictions: a magnetism that draws us in and fear that pushes us away. Molly Segal explores the stories we share about bears, what they say about us and our future.
Making the Team with 2017 Friesen Prize winner Dr. Alan Bernstein
November 16th, 2017, 07:59 AM
2017 Friesen Prize winner Dr. Alan Bernstein talks with Paul Kennedy about his contributions to Canadian Medicine and advanced research. He continues to encourage and develop the spirit of teamwork that has characterized his entire career.
Confronting the 'perfect storm': How to feed the future
November 15th, 2017, 07:59 AM
We're facing what could be a devastating crisis—how to feed ourselves without destroying the ecosystems we depend on. In partnership with the Arrell Food Institute at the University of Guelph we seek out creative solutions to a looming disaster.
Naked in the Mirror: Stephen Greenblatt on our obsession with Adam & Eve
November 14th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Paul Kennedy discovers why the story of Adam and Eve has resonated with religious and secular minds alike, as he speaks to Stephen Greenblatt, author of “The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve.”
The 2016 U.S. ELECTION: We had no idea it would be like this
November 12th, 2017, 07:59 AM
When Hillary Clinton announced that she would run for President, everyone knew the 2016 United States election could be a historic one. We had no idea how historic or unprecedented this election would become.
Lecture 5: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures)
November 9th, 2017, 07:59 AM
A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 5, "The Spirit of Human Rights", was recorded in front of an audience in Toronto.
Lecture 4: "In Search of a Better World" (The 2017 CBC Massey Lectures)
November 8th, 2017, 07:59 AM
A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 4, "The Oneness of Humankind", was recorded in front of an audience in St. John's, Nfld.
Lecture 3: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)
November 7th, 2017, 07:59 AM
A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 3, "The Will to Intervene", was recorded in front of an audience in Montreal, Quebec.
Lecture 2: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)
November 6th, 2017, 07:59 AM
A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 2, "In Pursuit of Global Justice", was recorded in front of an audience in Vancouver, British
Lecture 1: "In Search of a Better World" by Payam Akhavan (2017 CBC Massey Lectures)
November 5th, 2017, 07:59 AM
A call to action for our times, Payam Akhavan's 2017 CBC Massey Lectures is a powerful survey of some of the major human rights struggles of our times. Lecture 1, "The Knowledge of Suffering", was recorded in front of an audience in Whitehorse, Yukon.
Democracy Undermined? Debating the impact of Donald Trump's presidency on democracy
November 1st, 2017, 07:59 AM
The Munk Debates put it starkly: Be It Resolved, American democracy is in its worst crisis in a generation, and Donald J. Trump is to blame. Andrew Sullivan and E. J. Dionne argue in favour of the resolution, Kimberley Strassel and Newt Gingrich against.
Sex, Truth and Audio Tape, Part 2: What does consent really mean?
October 31st, 2017, 07:59 AM
The Harvey Weinstein story has unleashed a veritable tsunami of sexual assault and harassment claims. And there's a huge gender gap at work: overwhelmingly, men are the accused perpetrators; women, the victims. Part 2 of a 2-part series.
Creating a city for all: The future of cities in the 21st century
October 30th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Cities still drive social progress, but many factors are changing our modern world, and cities are again being forced to retool and rethink how they work. A discussion from the Stratford Festival.
Meat on the table: Can we justify consuming animals?
October 26th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Gary Francione a staunch opponent of meat production and consumption debates cattle rancher and vegetarian Nicolette Hahn Niman on the ethics of consuming animals.
Sex, Truth and Audio Tape: Shifting identities on a changing sexual landscape
October 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
What are we to make of today's sexual landscape, where we see the most diverse range of orientations and expressions of sexuality in history? Part 1 of a 2-part series.
Master of his own design: Frank Gehry, rebel architect (Part 1)
October 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 1 of a 2-part series.
Master of his own design: Becoming Frank Gehry (Part 2)
October 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Canadian-born Frank Gehry has been called the greatest architect of our time. And yet he's still a rebel in his field. IDEAS producer Mary Lynk a rare chance to talk with him in California. Part 2 of a 2-part series.
El Sistema: How the power of music helped change Venezuelan lives
October 22nd, 2017, 07:59 AM
"Playing for Their Lives" - a documentary by Philip Coulter about El Sistema: a radical music education programme in Venezuela designed to get young people off the streets founded by Juan Antonio Abru.
Dark tower of dreams: Inside the Walled City of Kowloon
October 17th, 2017, 07:59 AM
The infamous "Walled City of Kowloon" was once the most populous spot on the planet. With 1.2 million people per square kilometre, it was a gigantic squatter's village. Paul Kennedy speaks with photographer Greg Girard, and urban designer Suenn Ho.
The Enright Files on Vladimir Putin's Russia
October 16th, 2017, 07:59 AM
In 1917, Russia's tsarist dynasty was overthrown and a Communist government took power. A century later, Russia is very much the state of Vladimir Putin, who rules as a strange hybrid of tsarism, Stalinism and post-Cold War turbocharged capitalism.
The edge of musical thinking: Capturing the spirit of tango and vibrato
October 15th, 2017, 07:59 AM
There's a purity to music. It takes us into its own world, far removed from frustrations and challenges of daily life. But hidden within those innocent-sounding musical flourishes, there often lies a history of passionate disagreement.
Bread: Salvation or Damnation? (Encore April 14, 2017)
October 12th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Bread is life. But for some, it represents a wrong turn in our species' evolution. Through conversation with bakers, religious leaders, historians and bread aficionados, producer Veronica Simmonds asks whether bread has led us to salvation or damnation.
Choose Life: The Lost Massey Lecture by George Wald
October 3rd, 2017, 07:59 AM
In 1970, outspoken Harvard biologist George Wald became the first natural scientist to give the CBC Massey Lectures. Lewis Auerbach produced the 1970 Wald lectures. He tells the remarkable backstory of Wald and his Massey talks.
Gun Crazy: How fetishizing guns shuts down debate about them (Encore January 7, 2016)
October 1st, 2017, 07:59 AM
Columbine. Sandy Hook. Orlando. Now Las Vegas: the biggest mass shooting in the history of the United States. The stories seem to follow a pattern: shock, outrage, calls for gun control and rehearsed defences of the status quo, with very little changing.
Undoing Forever: The implications of de-extinction (Encore June 19, 2014)
September 28th, 2017, 07:59 AM
In labs around the world, scientists -- using the latest biotechnology -- are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.
Savign Syria: Keeping war-torn culture alive (Encore March 24, 2017)
September 27th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Destruction and displacement -- that's the story of Syria today. Paul Kennedy talks with three Syrians who believe in other Syrias, with stories about love, and laughter, and smell of jasmine and tarragon
Less work and more leisure: Utopian visions and the future of work
September 26th, 2017, 07:59 AM
In Part 3 of her series on the future of work, Jill Eisen looks at the promise of technology — and how it can lead to a better world.
Expletive Repeated: Why swearing matters (Encore March 16, 2017)
September 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Profanity was once considered rude and crude -- a linguistic last resort. Not so these days. Younger generations use swearing as everyday slang, and academics study it as an ever-evolving form of creative and cultural expression.
The Self-Taught Philosopher (Encore May 16, 2017)
September 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Naheed Mustafa tells the story of philosopher-physician Ibn Tufayl who wrote the first Arabic novel "Hayy ibn Yaqzan". It may be the most important story you've never heard.
The Future of Work, Part 2: The highs and lows of digital platforms
September 19th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them.
Decolonization: The Next 150 on Indigenous Lands
September 18th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Three Indigenous PhD students (Réal Carrière , Keri Cheechoo and Cherry Smiley) share their insights at a public forum hosted at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The theme: “The Next 150, on Indigenous Lands.”
Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed?
September 13th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Global warming is "Fake News", a "Chinese Hoax". So says a richly funded Conservative movement that's become a world-wide campaign. In her book, "The Merchants of Doubt", Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it.
Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work, Part 1
September 12th, 2017, 07:59 AM
AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up -- to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. Part 1 of 3.
Autonomy: The unexpected implications of self-driving vehicles
September 11th, 2017, 07:59 AM
We're racing down the highway to autonomous cars, whether it takes 10, 20 or 30 years. But what happens to our economy, the shape of our cities, and even our century-old car-centric culture once the vehicles arrive?
The Politics of the Professoriat: Political diversity on campus
September 7th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Universities are supposed to be dedicated to the exchange of ideas. But according to social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, campuses now skew so far to the left that they’ve become “political monocultures” .
Are We F--ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change
September 6th, 2017, 07:59 AM
The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. And we're only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. Despite all of these dire events and projections, the attacks continue — on climate scientists.
The art of crime fiction & what it says about human nature
September 4th, 2017, 07:59 AM
Murder mysteries are conventionally thought of as staples of beach and cottage reading – not particularly taxing on the intellect. But that belies the depth and variety of crime writing today, as well as its ubiquity in both pop and literary culture.
Generation Mars- Part Two
August 31st, 2017, 07:59 AM
If we could go to the moon, we could go anywhere, right? Stephen Humphrey and a stellar crew of authors, astronauts and Mars scholars confront the hazards, risks and challenges of getting humans to Mars, and then of surviving and living on the Red Planet
How opening our ears can open our minds: Hildegard Westerkamp
August 30th, 2017, 07:59 AM
"To be in the present as a listener is a revolutionary act. We absolutely need it, to be grounded in that way." Soundscape composer Hildegard Westerkamp hears the world differently than most people.
The Orwell Tapes- Part Three
August 29th, 2017, 07:59 AM
His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?
The Return of History- Your Questions
August 28th, 2017, 07:59 AM
The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions -- and thoughtful answers -- in each city on the tour. In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by our radio and online audiences.
The Challenge of Words
August 27th, 2017, 07:59 AM
The novel -- an art form that's centuries old -- still has the capacity to hold our attention from subway commute to library chair. But what is the future of literary writing in our hyperfast, overcaffeinated, 140-character, social-media-blasted world?
Generation Mars- Part One
August 24th, 2017, 07:59 AM
The day might well be approaching when humans set foot on Mars. We'll be driven by a desire to find life -- or what remains of it -- and to colonize the planet.