Philosophy News
How well do you know Swami Vivekānanda [quiz]
June 27th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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This June, the OUP Philosophy team honors Swami Vivekānanda (born Narendranath Datta, 1863–1902) as their Philosopher of the Month. Born in Calcutta under colonial rule, Vivekānanda became a Hindu religious leader, and one of the most prominent disciples of guru and mystic Śri Rāmakṛṣṇa. After delivering a highly regarded speech as the Hindu delegate to the World Parliament of Religions in 1893, Vivekānanda gained worldwide recognition before returning to India to found the Ramakrishna Mission. Vivekānanda inspired a newfound pride in the hearts of Hindus as his non-dualistic, Advaita Vedānta philosophy helped spread the spiritual traditions of India to the Christian West. How much do you know about Swami Vivekānanda? Put your knowledge to the test with our quiz! Quiz image: Swami Vivekananda, 1893. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. Featured image: Taj Mahal landscape. Public domain via Pixabay. The post How well do you know Swami Vivekānanda [quiz] appeared first on. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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The search for ecstasy. In 1960 an estimated 20 percent of Americans said they'd had a mystical experience. Now it's 50 percent
June 26th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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The search for ecstasy. In 1960 an estimated 20 percent of Americans said they'd had a mystical experience. Now it's 50 percent

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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The essay, that most elegant and slippery of forms, resists being pinned down. Its strength derives from a “combination of exactitude and evasion”
June 26th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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The essay, that most elegant and slippery of forms, resists being pinned down. Its strength derives from a “combination of exactitude and evasion”

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Is a tome three feet wide by two feet high a book? What about one with an embedded digital clock? Or a suitcase filled with lithographs?
June 26th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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Is a tome three feet wide by two feet high a book? What about one with an embedded digital clock? Or a suitcase filled with lithographs?

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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A Fortunate Universe: Life in a Finely Tuned Cosmos
June 26th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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2017.06.28 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Geraint F. Lewis and Luke A. Barnes, A Fortunate Universe: Life in a Finely Tuned Cosmos, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 373pp., $27.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107156616. Reviewed by Yann Benétreau-Dupin, University of Pittsburgh This new book by cosmologists Geraint F. Lewis and Luke A. Barnes is another entry in the long list of cosmology-centered physics books intended for a large audience. While many such books aim at advancing a novel scientific theory,[1] this one has no such scientific pretense. Its goals are to assert that the universe is fine-tuned for life, to defend that this fact can reasonably motivate further scientific inquiry as to why it is so, and to show that the multiverse and intelligent design hypotheses are reasonable proposals to explain this fine-tuning. This book's potential contribution, therefore, lies in how convincingly and efficiently it can make that case.

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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Justice
June 26th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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[New Entry by David Miller on June 26, 2017.] The idea of justice occupies centre stage both in ethics, and in legal and political philosophy. We apply it to individual actions, to laws, and to public policies, and we think in each case that if they are unjust this is a strong, maybe even conclusive, reason to reject them. Classically, justice was counted as one of the four cardinal virtues (and sometimes as the most important of the four); in modern times John Rawls famously described it as 'the first virtue of social institutions' (Rawls 1971, p.3; Rawls,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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If economists aren't questioning the effectiveness of economic theory, they should be. Simply put: Their claim to scientific expertise is no longer tenable
June 25th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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If economists aren't questioning the effectiveness of economic theory, they should be. Simply put: Their claim to scientific expertise is no longer tenable

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Foucault's Futures: A Critique of Reproductive Reason
June 25th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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2017.06.27 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Penelope Deutscher, Foucault's Futures: A Critique of Reproductive Reason, Columbia University Press, 2017, 261pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231176415. Reviewed by Colin Koopman, University of Oregon Penelope Deutscher's latest book is both a continuation of work in four previous books written at the intersection of continental and feminist philosophy, and at the same time a new investigation that brings that intersection to bear specifically on the work of Michel Foucault. Deutscher's three prior monographs were primarily focused on single philosophical figures (Luce Irigaray, Simone de Beauvoir, and Jacques Derrida) in whose work there is without any doubt an extensive engagement with questions of gender and sexual difference. By contrast, Foucault's work has widely been taken to be less concerned, or at least more variably engaged, with matters of gender and sex. Thus feminist scholarship on Foucault has. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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The brief rise of "prince poo." How the Enlightenment's sensory awakening reached its apex (or nadir) during a French craze for garments the color of baby poop
June 25th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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The brief rise of "prince poo." How the Enlightenment's sensory awakening reached its apex (or nadir) during a French craze for garments the color of baby poop

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Bernard-Henri Lévy can barely read Hebrew and hasn't devoted much time or energy to studying Judaism. That hasn't stopped him from writing a book of pronouncements on the topic
June 25th, 2017, 06:02 AM
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Bernard-Henri Lévy can barely read Hebrew and hasn't devoted much time or energy to studying Judaism. That hasn't stopped him from writing a book of pronouncements on the topic

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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