Philosophy News
William Heytesbury
January 19th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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[Revised entry by Miroslav Hanke and Elzbieta Jung on January 19, 2018. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Miroslav Hanke and Elzbieta Jung replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous author.] William Heytesbury (c. 1313 - 1372/3), a member of Oxford's Merton College and the School of "Oxford Calculators", was...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

An angry woman can make people uneasy, while a sad woman tends to summon sympathy. But anger can be a responsibility, says Leslie Jamison. It's about accountability
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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An angry woman can make people uneasy, while a sad woman tends to summon sympathy. But anger can be a responsibility, says Leslie Jamison. It's about accountability

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Joseph Conrad hated being called a writer of “sea stories.” Yet his experience of travel and displacement is what makes his work resonate today
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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Joseph Conrad hated being called a writer of “sea stories.” Yet his experience of travel and displacement is what makes his work resonate today

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Only 700 publications existed in 1865. More than 4,400 existed by 1890, letting readers make tangible connections to other lonely readers
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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Only 700 publications existed in 1865. More than 4,400 existed by 1890, letting readers make tangible connections to other lonely readers

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

Aristotle's Concept of Mind
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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2018.01.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Erick Raphael Jiménez, Aristotle's Concept of Mind, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 265pp., $99.99, ISBN 9781108151825. Reviewed by Matthew D. Walker, Yale-NUS College Erick Raphael Jiménez articulates a systematic account of Aristotle's view of mind (nous). He translates the Greek nous as "mind" on the grounds that other translations, such as "intellect," portray nous as a faculty (p. 12). Jiménez rejects this portrayal: nous is "not simply a naturally given faculty for the perception of a certain sort of perceptible" (p. 16), and "not possessed simply 'by nature'" (p. 44). On the contrary, Jiménez holds -- as his book's first main thesis -- that mind is a "virtue rather than a natural capacity" (p. 7), "a state of intellectual excellence, and not a potentiality like sensation" (p. 33). Nous is attained through actively coming to understand: "Mind and understanding are not potentialities predating... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Health Care Workers & Moral Objections I: Procedures
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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Embed from Getty Images The Trump administration plans to modify the Health and Human Services (HHS) civil rights office to protect health care workers who have moral or religious objections to performing certain medical procedures or treating certain patients. As should be expected, the focus of concern is mainly on abortion and transgender patients. Two of the general moral issues raised by this situation are whether health workers have the moral right to refuse certain services and whether they have the right to refuse to treat certain patients based on the identity of the patients. While some might, perhaps while thinking of abortion rights, automatically conclude that health care workers have no moral right to refuse services, this would be far to hasty. After all, entering a profession does not entail that a person surrenders their moral rights or conscience. To think otherwise would be to embrace the discredited notion that just following orders or just doing one’s job provides. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

Platonism in the Philosophy of Mathematics
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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[Revised entry by Øystein Linnebo on January 18, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Platonism about mathematics (or mathematical platonism) is the metaphysical view that there are abstract mathematical objects whose existence is independent of us and our language, thought, and practices. Just as electrons and planets exist independently of us, so do numbers and sets. And just as statements about electrons and planets are made true or false by the objects with which they are concerned and these objects' perfectly objective properties, so are statements about...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Privacy
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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[Revised entry by Judith DeCew on January 18, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term "privacy" is used frequently in ordinary language as well as in philosophical, political and legal discussions, yet there is no single definition or analysis or meaning of the term. The concept of privacy has broad historical roots in sociological and anthropological discussions about how extensively it is valued and preserved in various cultures. Moreover, the concept has historical origins in well known philosophical discussions, most notably...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Georg [György] Lukács
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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[Revised entry by Titus Stahl on January 18, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Georg (Gyorgy) Lukacs (1885 - 1971) was a literary theorist and philosopher who is widely viewed as one of the founders of "Western Marxism". Lukacs is best known for his pre-World War II writings in literary theory, aesthetic theory and Marxist philosophy. Today, his most widely read works are the Theory of the Novel of 1916 and History and Class Consciousness of 1923. In History and Class Consciousness, Lukacs laid out a wide-ranging critique of the phenomenon of "reification" in capitalism and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Axiomatic Theories of Truth
January 18th, 2018, 04:20 PM
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[Revised entry by Volker Halbach and Graham E. Leigh on January 18, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] An axiomatic theory of truth is a deductive theory of truth as a primitive undefined predicate. Because of the liar and other paradoxes, the axioms and rules have to be chosen carefully in order to avoid inconsistency. Many axiom systems for the truth predicate have been discussed in the literature and their respective properties been analysed. Several philosophers, including many deflationists, have endorsed axiomatic theories of truth in their accounts of truth. The logical properties of the formal theories are relevant to various philosophical questions, such as questions about the ontological status of properties, Godel's theorems,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy