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Pound and Eliot. Lish and Carver. Brod and Kafka. Fiction editors sit uncomfortably at the intersection of art and commerce. The role is ripe for recrimination
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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Pound and Eliot. Lish and Carver. Brod and Kafka. Fiction editors sit uncomfortably at the intersection of art and commerce. The role is ripe for recrimination

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics: Debunking and Dispensability
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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2017.05.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Uri D. Leibowitz and Neil Sinclair (eds.), Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics: Debunking and Dispensability, Oxford University Press, 2016, 257pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198778592. Reviewed by Karl Schafer, University of California, Irvine This collection brings together two groups of essays, unified by a concern for the relevance of explanatory considerations to metaethics and philosophy of mathematics. The first group (by Justin Clarke-Doane, Folke Tersman, Toby Handfield, Erik J. Wielenberg, Hallvard Lillehammer) focuses on the potential negative role of such considerations. More precisely, these essays discuss "evolutionary debunking arguments" -- for example, arguments that aim to show that the evolutionary origins of our moral faculties undermine our entitlement to treat these faculties as tracking "realistically-construed" moral facts.[1] The second group of essays (by Alexander Miller, David. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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PhD student in Ethics of human enhancement in an international context
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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Job List: 
Europe
Name of institution: 
University of Twente
Town: 
Enschede
Country: 
Netherlands
. . .

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News source: Jobs In Philosophy

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Robert Alyngton
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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[Revised entry by Alessandro Conti on May 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text] Robert Alyngton was one of the most important authors of the generation after John Wyclif. He was deeply influenced by Walter Burley's logico-ontological system and Wyclif's metaphysics. His major extant work, a commentary on the Categories, heavily depends on Burley's last commentary on the Categories and Wyclif's De ente praedicamentali. Yet he was able to develop new logical and semantic theories as well as the general strategy adopted...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Panhandling & Free Expression
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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Embed from Getty Images Many local officials tend to believe that panhandlers are detrimental to local businesses and tourism and, as such, it is no surprise that there have been many efforts to ban begging. While local governments keep trying to craft laws to pass constitutional muster, their efforts have generally proven futile in the face of the First Amendment. While the legal questions are addressed by courts, there remains the moral question of whether the banning of panhandling can be morally justified. The obvious starting point for a moral argument for banning panhandling is a utilitarian approach. As noted above, local officials generally want to have such bans because they believe panhandlers can be bad for local businesses and tourism in general. For example, if potential customers are accosted by scruffy and unwashed panhandlers on the streets around businesses, then they are less likely to patronize those businesses. As another example, if a city gets a reputation for. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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Political Realism in International Relations
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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[Revised entry by W. Julian Korab-Karpowicz on May 24, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] In the discipline of international relations there are contending general theories or theoretical perspectives. Realism, also known as political realism, is a view of international politics that stresses its competitive and conflictual side. It is usually contrasted with idealism or liberalism, which tends to emphasize cooperation. Realists consider the principal actors in the international arena to be states, which are concerned with their own security, act in pursuit of their...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Wilfrid Sellars and the nature of normativity
May 24th, 2017, 07:16 PM
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Wilfrid Sellars would have been 105 this month. He stands out as one of the more ambitiously systematic philosophers of the last century, with contributions to ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of language, alongside incisive historical examinations of Kant, and several others. We can read him as a philosopher in a classical mode, always in conversation with figures from the past. But he also had a very modern set of concerns: what is it to construct scientific theories, and how do we fit into the “image” of the world that they generate? This ambitious project was what first drew me to Sellars’s work. One focus running across his work is the nature of normativity – what we ought to do, what is good, correct, etc. Sellars demonstrated the indispensability of normative dimensions of our concept usage, not only to moral reasoning, but also to epistemic facts. This dimension of his work would be folded into equally robust commitments to naturalism and scientific. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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Free Time
May 23rd, 2017, 07:16 PM
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2017.05.24 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Julie L. Rose, Free Time, Princeton University Press, 2016, 169pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163451. Reviewed by Eric Rakowski, University of California at Berkeley Liberal egalitarian theories of distributive justice focus predominantly on what it means for a society to treat people as equals in allocating material resources and discrete opportunities, such as the chance to obtain an education, to secure employment, to buy insurance, and to participate in civic life. They tend to say nothing directly about the time people have available to pursue ends they choose. Julie L. Rose's book spotlights this omission. Her specific concern is free time, defined as "the time beyond that which it is objectively necessary for one to spend to meet one's own basic needs, or the basic needs of one's dependents, whether with necessary paid work, household labor, or personal care." (58) Rose argues forcefully that free. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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There will be cats. Murakami novels feature felines, detective heroes, and creepy sex. Readers are so hooked on the formula that the variations hardly matter
May 23rd, 2017, 07:16 PM
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There will be cats. Murakami novels feature felines, detective heroes, and creepy sex. Readers are so hooked on the formula that the variations hardly matter

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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Margaret Wise Brown avoided witches, trolls, glass slippers, and sleeping beauties. Instead she revolutionized picture books, even prompting Gertrude Stein to write one
May 23rd, 2017, 07:16 PM
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Margaret Wise Brown avoided witches, trolls, glass slippers, and sleeping beauties. Instead she revolutionized picture books, even prompting Gertrude Stein to write one

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News source: Arts & Letters Daily

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