The Montreal Review
Postapocalyptic Dissent | Curtis Freeman | Art: Leonid Afremov
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Cotton Mather began the final book of his Magnalia Christi Americana, published in 1702, by telling the story of a windmill in the Netherlands that turned so wildly during a violent storm its grinding stone became overheated, causing the mill to catch fire and setting the entire town ablaze. Mather went on to claim that the whole country of America was once set on fire by a man with the rapid motion of a windmill in his head...
Ray L. Hart's "God Being Nothing" | Clayton Crockett
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For Ray L. Hart, God is first of all a word, 'a word in the English language'. Because God is a word without an obvious referent, it poses a question to anyone who thinks about the concept that is associated with the word God. And this question “will be a potential goad to think God,” which is the basis for theological reflection...
Sunaisthesis | John von Heyking
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
We are most complete, most alive, when we live for another, and when we tell each other stories about our lives lived together...
Woodrow Wilson, Religion, and The New World Order | Lauren F. Turek
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Shortly before assuming the presidency in 1913, Woodrow Wilson told a friend that 'it would be an irony of fate if my administration had to deal chiefly with foreign affairs.' This now famous exchange notwithstanding, the advent of World War I and the expansive, idealistic vision that Wilson articulated for the postwar order ensured that he and his administration engaged in foreign affairs deeply during his time in office...
Peace in Our Time: Neville Chamberlain's Appeasment Policy | Yoav J. Tenembaum
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Eighty years ago, Neville Chamberlain became British prime minister. He is best known for the appeasement policy he pursued towards Nazi Germany. Had he resigned or died before he assumed the post of prime minister, he would have been considerably less known, but significantly better remembered...
No, Sexuality And Gender Are Not Up To Me | Bruce Fleming
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Gender theory is a hot subject academically these days. In terms of methodology, it is positioned somewhere between humanities and social sciences, because it has found a point of view that makes sexuality subjective rather than objective but still wants to make general observations valid for all. It places the emphasis on the individual and what s/he decides to do rather than on presupposed, unalterable common acts that can only be discussed scientifically and thus independently of the will of the individual, yet wants to say general things about it all the same...
John Ashbery and Robert Frank: The Role of Chance in Poetry and Photography | William Doreski
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry and still photography appear to be incompatible aesthetic media. Both expect the viewer or reader to enact them by participation, but in different ways. Poetry is temporal, with a clearly defined beginning and ending, requiring sequential reading, while a photograph offers a single image that does not oblige the viewer to enact a particular sequence of experiential positions...
Accidental Gravity | Bernard Quetchenbach
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Genesee, my first river, was shallow but strong willed at Kishketuck, not many miles above a series of plunges into Letchworth gorge. Once Charlie had to shout awake a placid boatload riding the flow toward the 'Grand Canyon of the East.'...
Service, In-Service, Servile | France Théoret
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Remi, my father, would complain about how his children were not servile. Eva, his wife, said he was jealous of each one of them. School promoted good feelings toward parents. We children adopted submissive behaviour. Some of us practised the humility that is fitting for inferiors. We put on acts of gratefulness...
Second Antechamber | Louise Dupré
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
it happens she leans into the window as if to feel her own absence. she leans in with obstinate slowness, topples, and behold the pane shatters yes shatters...
Wrestling with Popular Sovereignty | Sanford Levinson | Art: Jean Fouquet
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Professor Tuck’s book should be of immense interest not only to his fellow political theorists, but also to the rest of us who find ourselves, with whatever degree of formal academic training or practical frustration, wrestling with the continued use of such terms as 'sovereignty' and 'democracy' whether in opinions of the United States or Canadian Supreme Courts or heated debates as part of mass politics across several continents...
The Tragedy of U.S. Foreign Policy | Charles Sharpe
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'The Tragedy of U.S. Diplomacy' resides in the fact that the concept of the nation state is incompatible with the only pillar of Christianity that the American Civil Religion has retained – its universality. For this reason, the Global Millennial ACR, which remained dormant from Roosevelt’s tenure until the collapse of the Soviet Union –– seeks to devour the United States. This development, along with other problematic trends that McDougall abhors, such as the rise of the surveillance state and the hedonistic “come-and-get-it” culture of Pax Americana, drive him to conclude his opus with dystopian predictions of his own...
Why Did Europe Conquer the World? | Walter Scheidel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A hundred years ago, Europeans controlled four-fifths of the world’s land surface outside Antarctica. Philip Hoffman, a prominent economic historian at the California Institute of Technology, asks what had made this possible. His answer is deceptively simple: if you want to conquer most of the globe, you need to be really, really good at waging war. Yet while it won’t come as a surprise that Europe’s endless conflicts had honed the martial skills of its belligerent nations, wouldn’t the same have been true of many other parts of the world?
America’s War in Laos Echoes Today | Michael Larkin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Some readers may be unaware that President Dwight Eisenhower told incoming President John F. Kennedy in 1961 that Laos was the most important foreign policy issue facing the United States. This helpful fact sets the stage at the beginning of Joshua Kurlantzick’s new book, 'A Great Place to Have a War.' Starting in the 1960s up until the early 1970s, the CIA waged war in Laos with near total secrecy, and consequently knowledge of the horrific destruction inflicted on Laotian society has been disguised...
Israel, Palestine: The Two-State Impossibility, The One-State Opportunity | Timothy Niedermann | Art: Wilhelm Sasnal
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It seems an obvious and fair question to ask: Why, after fifty years of occupation and control, hasn’t Israel managed to come up with a solution to the impasse it is in with regard to the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza? The so-called Two-State Solution has been proposed and is widely accepted as the right way to go—the Jewish state of Israel bordered by a Palestinian state. The US supports it. European governments support it. Even Israel and the Palestinians say they support it. Yet there has been no progress...
Ernst Kantorowicz: A Life | Michael D. Bailey
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
W. H. Auden once remarked that he sometimes avoided unwanted questions about being a poet by telling people instead that he was a medieval historian. He did so because “it freezes conversation.” Ernst Kantorowicz, however, was a medieval historian who could bring conversations to a boil. Highly cultured and urbane, he began life as a far-right nationalist but had to flee his native land and ended up opposing an anti-Communist witch-hunt in his adopted country. Robert Lerner, himself a leading medieval historian, relates this amazing story with both carefully researched detail and engaging verve...
Fragments from the life of the spectacular victim | Ece Temelkuran| Art: Enrico Bertuccioli
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I was supposed to be writing about a refugee in Istanbul. Then she disappeared. Most of them do disappear now and then. Shortly thereafter, I had to disappear. Therefore, I am now the subject matter of this text, although I am not a refugee, but rather in self-imposed exile, or a seemingly self-imposed exile. Does the terminology matter if you constantly feel the heartache of that Syrian woman, talking to a journalist on the Turkish coast upon her arrival last summer, saying, ‘I wish I was dead so my pride would not be broken like this’?
It's Not Too Late To Learn From Hungary's Past | Margaret McMullan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Shortly after Donald Trump was elected, my friend Renata emailed from Hungary. 'I don't know what to say. We are shocked by the result...What happened to America? Is there any hope to wait for anything good?'
(Wo)man is Still the Measure of All Things | Bruce Fleming | Art: Neil Macpherson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Protagoras was right. Man is still the measure of all things. Yet nowadays we’ve forgotten this. The happy illusion of our age is that we have transcended the mere human with information, which can be stored in huge quantities (so huge we can’t even imagine) in machines that, unlike old-fashioned storage bins like museums and libraries, don’t take up room and don’t require constant upkeep and maintenance. Information is cumulative: we get more and more of it to the point where humans are dwarfed by its magnitude, and that is good. It never topples over, it never collapses under its own weight, it never gets moth-eaten or decays. And it’s all available to us, recallable to our fingertips by super-fast search engines...
Musings on the feminist movement... | Sarah Engelhard | Art: Neil Macpherson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1969 I hosted a TV show, THE NEW WOMAN, out of Philadelphia, Pa. WTAF-TV channel 29. I didn’t know then, on the cusp of the feminist movement that I, like goddess Isis, and womankind, would have to pick-up the dismembered pieces of our men, put the pieces back together and, with magic, fashion a new penis for the one that had been swallowed by a crab...
MONTREAL, 1967 | Connie McParland | Art: Expo 67 posters
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
1967 was the most exciting time to be living in Montreal. To mark Canada’s centennial, the city hosted a world fair, Expo 67, and it opened its doors to visitors from all over the world. The Fair provided the illusion of travel, and a vision of the world containing different worlds. Tickets to the fair sites and newly built amusement park, La Ronde, were sold as passports. We could skip and jump from pavilion to pavilion—from Canada, to Russia, to France, to Ethiopia, and back to Canada―as often as we wanted...
Autumn | An excerpt from Irena Karafilly's The House on Selkirk Avenue | Art: Pim Sekeris
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It starts out to be a perfectly ordinary day; a mild, erratically windy morning on which the sky seems undecided between sun and rain and the shrinking hours hint at nothing beyond the usual small blessings and vexations. Dressed in robe and slippers, Kate has stepped out onto the balcony, to pick up a drying bra, but something in the air prompts her to linger under the canvas awning, gazing down at the leaf-strewn lawn, the empty McGill Ghetto street...
The Ladder of Silence | Gonzalinho da Costa | Art: Eugene Lushpin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The ladder of silence consists of seven steps. The first step is habitual prayer. The second step is to speak only when necessary, whatever necessary, to the extent possible...
Barack Obama and the Pious Mob | Michael Peter Bolus | Art: Fresco on the central wall of the exedra of House of the Vettii in Pompeii
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It is an ancient tale, born thousands of years ago in a remote and shadowy epoch — a story which would be codified many centuries later by the great poets and dramatists who helped compel their culture’s emergence from a frightening and dark age...
Bob Dylan and the American Past | A.E. Smith | Art: Blood on the Tracks, Album Cover
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many years ago, my mother and I were driving down Russell Hill Road in Toronto. I had been living outside of Canada for a while and we were in the long process of catching up. My mother asked me something about my old girlfriend. I thought for a moment and then, instead of answering her question, I sampled Bob Dylan...
M*A*S*H: The 60s are Dead | Bruce Fleming | Art: M*A*S*H, Film Poster
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Back at the end of the 1960s, this movie (M.A.S.H.), at least to me, had seemed like a huge hilarious middle finger to The Man. Watergate hadn’t happened yet (the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. has just re-opened, with a 60s theme and many references to the famous burglary that took down President Nixon: the room cards say 'No Need to Break In'); the US wasn’t yet talking with the North Vietnamese—now we’re buddies with the re-united Vietnam ruled by the north, which probably makes your running shoes. In Nixon’s Vietnam-era America, this movie was the height of good-guy and -gal pacifist chic. The bottom line of the movie was of its time too: sex is good, the military is bad...
A Generation of Scrappers | Aaron James Henry
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It started with Torrent. In the Internet’s under-toe, a bunch of us were desperate to cobble together a film or video game from the scraps of free-floating bits and bytes...
The Greatest Discovery of All | Yoav J. Tenembaum | Art: Félix Parra Hernández, "Galileo at the University of Padua Demonstrating the New Astronomical Theories", 1873
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The greatest discovery of all is the question; the realization that our mind can leap forward from ignorance to curiosity, from appearance to doubt, from assumption to fact – and the consequent realization that in order to do that an intellectual bridge is needed in the form of a question...
Moses | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
One might conceive of Moses as a Kafkaesque figure, a person of uncertain speech and identity, a son of two cultures, commanded by Hashem - the Almighty - to talk Pharaoh into freeing the Hebrew slaves, his people, explain the divine mission to the Hebrews and to achieve this with an impaired vocal skill, lips 'uncircumcised'...
Kremlin's New Ideology | T.S.Tsonchev | Art: Lilias Buchanan: Series of illustrations for Leo Tolstoy's 'The Death of Ivan Ilyich'
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There is a kind of fusion of religion and politics in contemporary Russia. This does not mean that there is a de-secularization of the Russian state and society; rather we witness a recovery and reinvention of an old form of caesaropapism that is traditional for the Russian political culture and experience. Over the centuries, before the end of monarchy, Russia considered itself as a Christian empire, the Third Rome, a successor of Byzantium, the Euro-Asiatic empire destroyed by the Ottomans. In Byzantium the emperor was the head of state and church. He was God's representative on earth. And now, in the 21st century, we see how these old ideas and mythologies are resurrected and successfully exploited by the power in Kremlin...
In the Beginning Was the Word; then Came the Film Version | Peter Swirski
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Book Review of Nicholas Ruddick's 'Science Fiction Adapted to Film'
Lessons from Stanislaw Lem and Peter Swirski | Iris Vidmar
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Back in the year two thousand, Peter Swirski took his interdisciplinary approach to Edgar Allan Poe and Stanislaw Lem. Rather than gushing over their artistic talent, Swirski focused on the extent to which these literary giants stepped into fields usually classified as ‘sciences only’...
Survival and Grace in Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich | A.E. Smith
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As a Slavophile, Solzhenitsyn thoroughly rejected any Western solutions for Russia or for individual Russians living the Soviet nightmare. Instead, he believed that to survive, whether as individuals, as a people or as a nation, the Russian people had to return to first principles, ancient Russian folkways and, particularly, faith in G-d. Indeed, he once summed up his understanding of the root cause of the “ruinous revolution” that, to him, had destroyed Russia: 'Men have forgotten G-d. That is why all this happened.'
Lingusitic realism: the dogma of the day | Bruce Fleming | Art: Urs Fischer's Misunderstandings in the Quest for the Universal
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Historians tell us that the University of Paris in the early 13th century was defined by its universal acceptance of a philosophical dogma derived from Plato and mandated by the Church, namely a belief in the realism of universals: what (say) makes all red things red is Redness, and has independent existence, ultimately in the mind of God. By the 15th century, however, the works of Aristotle with his rejection of Plato had gained the upper hand, and nominalism, the dogma that universals had no independent existence, gradually became the norm. One dogma displaced another. But of course both dogmas were only ever accepted by intellectuals: those outside were merely going about living their lives...
Climate Change, Violence—What can be done? | An Interview with Roy Scranton
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Learning to Die in the Anthropocene is a philosophical meditation, in the tradition of Susan Sontag or Camus, on climate change and how to approach and think about climate change from a humanistic perspective...
Europe, Brexit and the Kantian garden | György Schöpflin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
At the end of the day, we have to establish a new narrative, a new formula for Europe. It has to be one that citizens can identify with and, ideally, is acceptable to those who are suspicious of Europe. If this formula does not emerge from the debate that is starting, Europe itself will be the loser...
The Christian Democratic Origins of the European Union | Ben Ryan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI continually reiterated, Europe should not turn its back on its Christian roots which have shaped its values and institutions. This does not mean a return to Christendom but a return to a deeper and wider understanding of what it means to be a European...
Shifting Europe - a historical view | Domhnall O'Sullivan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I recently came across a 1994 volume of the cultural journal Dædalus, still published today by MIT. What initially attracted me was the cover, a colourful oil sketch of Muscovite cupolas, and the catchy title of the special issue: ‘After Communism: What?’ However, the contents were even more worthwhile as a historical time capsule. Academics and politicians of the time try to make sense of post-Communist Europe in a collection of essays analyzing the particular historic moment of the early 1990s: the last time the continent underwent such a sudden, wide-ranging shift before now...
Kant and Idol Worship | Robert Wexelblatt | Art: Walter Bortolossi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'Virtue often consists only in a willingness to give in to the smaller vice...'
Academic Freedom: Don’t Turn The University Into A Clinic | Frank Furedi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There was a time when universities provided a hospitable environment for intellectual experimentation, the questioning of prevailing conventions and the pursuit of robust debate. Even at times when society was dominated by a climate of conformism, the university offered academics and their students opportunities to question prevailing conventions...
Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, and Oliver O'Donovan on Judgment and Justice | T.S.Tsonchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
We are permitted to judge merely the act of man, his momentous will as expressed in the case. We pronounce a verdict over the casus, and over the particular action, a verdict according to the truth. But the neighbor, not his act, but the neighbor, is the one that we are called not to judge, but to love...
The Crisis of Liberal Secularism | TMR
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Secularism is not as 'secular' as we are used to hear. In fact, secularism is the unexpected 'child' of Christianity; a child that many non-Christian societies have tried to adopt. This child, metaphorically speaking, has become an adult, and today, it seems to experience a 'middle-age' crisis. These are some of the main arguments of Jacob De Roover's new book 'Europe, India, and the Limits of Secularism.'...
HARTWIG EBERSBACH ABSTRACT AVANT-GARDE PAINTING IN GDR | by Paul-Henri Campbell | Photo: Marcel Schawe
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Although German Reunification commemorated its 25th anniversary last year, the German art scene continues to be weirdly bipolar. By zooming in on individual careers of artists, however, one may come to appreciate the web of complicated relations that shaped East and West German painting during the Cold War and afterwards. Hartwig Ebersbach is a painter of the former GDR, though his success was reared in the West...
THE ART OF ARTERTAINMENT, AMERICAN STYLE | by Peter Swirski | Art: Andy Warhol
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In the second decade of the third millennium fast divisions between high art and popular entertainment are dissolving. On the one hand, popular fiction is increasingly recognized not only as a crucial component of democratizing populism but, on occasion at least, also as art...
POPE FRANCIS AND THE JOY OF LOVE | by Eileen P. Flynn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On April 8, 2016 the Vatican issued the English translation of Amoris Laetitia, the Joy of Love, written by Pope Francis. The document consists of 325 paragraphs arranged in eight chapters and takes the form of an apostolic exhortation. An apostolic exhortation is different from an encyclical in that it does not define doctrine. Amoris Laetitia conveys Pope Francis' conclusions about how the family should be understood and how everyone in the Catholic Church should exercise their roles in regard to the family. The exhortation is...
FROM MONTREAL TO BEIJING | by Daniel A. Bell
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For a young Montrealer growing up in the 1960s and 70s, China seemed like a far away, almost imaginary place, with utopian communities like Shangri-La and Xanadu (I’ve since visited both places – Xanadu is a patch of grassland in Inner Mongolia and “Shangri-La” is a small town in Yunnan province that has been renamed to attract foreign tourists). My only experience with the country consisted of...
CRACKS | by Andreas Kuersten | Art: Jiang Pengyi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It’s a quiet Sunday afternoon in the nation’s capital, September 27th, 2015; the day after Chinese President Xi Xinping departed for New York City. Chinese flags placed on the light posts along Constitution Avenue still wave. They flow with the cadence of a cool fall breeze, flanked on either side by the flags of the United States of America and District of Columbia...
NEURO-PHILOSOPHY OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS | by Nayef Al-Rodhan | Art: Heidi Whitman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Neuroscience has had limited disciplinary connectivity to the field of International Relations (IR) and Politics. The field of IR is traditionally understood to be about the relations between states, competition, power and resources. As a result, the findings of neuroscience appear to hold little relevance for IR scholars...
PLAYING WITH THE DEVIL: THE COMIC MORALITY OF MIKHAIL BULGAKOV | by Angus Smith
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I first discovered Mikhail Bulgakov in an anthology of Soviet science fiction. I was a 9th grade nebbish and budding Slavophile haunting the shelves of the Forest Hill Public Library. I wasn’t an SF fan by any stretch of the imagination, but I recognized a couple of the names in the table of contents and the title of the Bulgakov story – novella, as it turned out – caught my eye: The Fatal Eggs. It tells the story of a brilliant scientist who has devoted his life to a masterpiece of pure research: a ray that can speed up and enhance biological processes...
A DEFENCE OF THE SOUL | by Gerald K. Harrison | Art: Rene Magritte
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The English philosopher Thomas Hobbes, writing in the 17th century, rejected the view that we are immaterial souls temporarily resident in our physical bodies. We are just complicated flesh machines - “What is a Heart, but a Spring; and the Nerves, but so many Strings; and the Joynts, but so many Wheeles, giving motion to the whole Body?” – and our minds, the ultimate bearers of our conscious experiences (our thoughts, desires, sensations) are just the electrified lumps of meat we call our brains...
THERE IS NO FUTURE TREE | by S. A. Miller | Art: Harry Callahan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My aim is to convince you of a few things, mostly about time. But, more than that, I want to ease your suffering...
THE ZETTABYTE PROBLEM, OR THE END OF CULTURAL HISTORY AS WE KNOW IT | Peter Swirski
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The problem with the zettabyte problem is that, even though the proportion of what is culturally valuable to the totality of the cultural information may not have changed (and how would you know?), multiplying both a millionfold has the effect of obscuring the former as effectively as if it was not there at all. It may take a long time, but you can be sure to find a proverbial good book in a thousand. But you will never find a million good books in a billion...
A PEARL | Paul Schollmeier
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Not long ago I had the good fortune to see the Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer at The Frick Collection in New York City. The painting was part of a visiting exhibit of fifteen paintings from the Dutch Golden Age on loan from the Mauritshuis in Amsterdam. The Mauritshuis was then undergoing a renovation. The renovation is now complete and by all accounts a great success...
THE MYTH OF RELIGIOUS VIOLENCE | Paul Allen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The historical record suggests that the religious/secular divide is not easily separated into distinct component parts. This is certainly true with respect to overlapping motivations within individuals...
THE FOUNDATIONS OF NATURAL MORALITY | S. Adam Seagrave
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It is difficult to view the intellectual trends of the past 50 years—or even the past 200 years, for that matter—alongside the argument of this book without thinking that this argument is either hopelessly anachronistic or especially timely. As the author, I hope it is the latter....
SECULAR POWERS: HUMILITY IN MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT | Julie E. Cooper
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
What does it mean to be secular? At one time, secularization was thought to be an inevitable consequence of modernization. With the shift from traditional communities to complex, differentiated societies, scholars predicted, religion would wither away...
THE ISLAMIC STATE (ISIL): POLITISIZED ISLAM AND AN IDEOLOGICAL WAR OF ATTRITION | Hamid Elyassi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The declared objective of Islamists has been to bring unity and power to Muslims and elevate their religion to a model for the world to follow. Ironically, they have only succeeded in creating political strife and sectarian division in the Islamic world, tarnishing the image of Islam and making Muslims the object of suspicion and misgiving. Of course, it is easy to identify Islam with Islamists and associate it with violence and reaction, but that would be blaming Christianity, the religion of love and tolerance, for the cruelty of the princes of the medieval Church and Buddhism, with its message of peace, for instances of ethnic violence...
HIJRA BEFORE ISIS | Rebecca Gould
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Along with jihad, hijra is one of the most powerful buzzwords in the vocabulary of the Islamic State. Signifying the obligation to migrate lands under Muslim rule, hijra has become a recruiting tool par excellence and accompanied the Islamic State’s rapid expansion across Syria and Iraq. The lure of migration accounts for the yearly exodus of thousands of young European and American men and women away from their homes to this new state. As the Islamic State expands, hijra is increasingly militarized...
THE 'EMOTIONAL' AMORAL EGOISM OF STATES | Nayef Al-Rodhan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1812 Napoleon Bonaparte, at the heights of his power, set out for the most adventurous, and ultimately fatal, military campaign. Napoleon’s Grand Army of over 500,000 men, the largest force ever mobilized to that date, was led to the lands of Russia. Historians have long investigated the misjudgements of this campaign and the question of hubris emerges as an underlying factor for Napoleon’s vehemence to pursue a disastrous campaign. Hubris is exaggerated pride, often combined with arrogance...
MYTHS OF THE OIL BOOM | Steve Yetiv
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Mark Twain once quipped that the 'trouble with the world is not that people know too little, but that they know so many things that ain't so.' Twain wasn’t talking about energy, which was hardly controversial in his era, but his timeless quote certainly resonates today...
AMERICAN POLITICAL FICTIONS | T. Klee
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Politics may be boring like hell to the outsiders, but not to those at the trough. Look again at the legislative floor, prompts Peter Swirski in American Utopia and Social Engineering, his recent book on American culture and American politics...
SPRINGTIME IN THE LAND OF MOTHBALLS | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On a week-day morning last fall I welcomed a group of well-dressed adults into my ninth grade classroom. It was Grandparents Day at the school where I teach English, and the development office had asked me to offer a mini-course on a topic of my choosing...
HAPPY IN 10 DAYS | J. Anthony Koster
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The man at the registration desk takes possession of my phone and valuables. 'Do you have any questions?' he asks. I hesitate. I have too many to think of the right one. I have just voluntarily handed over my phone—that should occasion a question or two. But I’ve missed my chance...
POST-RATIONAL MANAGEMENT | David K. Hurst
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ever since the European Enlightenments, the English and Scottish 'sociology of virtue' has been in conflict with the French 'ideology of reason'. For the British philosophers the essence of human nature was a moral sense of right and wrong and a natural empathy for others. For the French philosophes, however, reason was paramount, the equivalent of 'what Grace is to the Christian'. Of course this strife didn’t begin in the 18th Century – it dates back through Aristotle and Plato, to much earlier times. Since then, however, the battle between what Adam Smith called 'moral sentiment' and pure reason has taken many forms and has been fought by proxies in many different places...
NIETZSCHE AND TOCQUEVILLE ON OUR DEMOCRATIC FUTURE | David A. Eisenberg | Art: Fran Recacha
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Democracies are not inherently utopian, but the aim of the modern democratic longing – an age of equality, free from privation and strife – unmistakably is. That those who harbor this longing tend not to consider themselves utopians does little to confute the character of their aims. Many of the greatest utopians of the nineteenth century disdained the title, but their reflections failed to repel the characterization...
NEUROCHEMICAL MAN AND EMOTIONAL AMORAL EGOISM | Nayef Al-Rodhan | Art: Paul Cadmus
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The levels of sophistication of science to date might not have managed to fully grasp ‘what man is like’ in neurobiological terms, yet Chekov’s instinct was sound: acquiring an accurate portrayal of human nature is a prerequisite for creating conditions that respect human dignity and morality. Attempts at moral education which fail to take into account fundamental neurochemical elements of human nature, are bound to prove unsuccessful. In some cases, these may even have undesired effects as they can lead to unreasonable expectations...
ETHICS AFTER ARISTOTLE | Brad Inwood
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The really great philosophers have enormous influence over the centuries. To take the measure of their impact is to understand European intellectual history in its broad outlines. Kant, Descartes, Plato and Aristotle himself – who was once known simply as ‘the philosopher’ – have all left indelible marks on western culture. Aristotelian physics and cosmology ran out of steam in the early modern era; physics, chemistry and astronomy snuffed out the explanatory charm of geocentrism, the theory of four elements, and celestial spheres. In the twentieth century aspects of Aristotelian metaphysics have made something of a comeback, but it’s feeble stuff compared to the enduring importance of his theory of the good life...
EVIL MEN | James Dawes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Several years ago, my colleague Adam Nadel and I took confessions from a group of convicted war criminals. They were veterans of the Imperial Japanese Army who, during the Second Sino-Japanese war, committed the worst crimes imaginable: torture, rape, murder of children, and diabolical medical experiments upon kidnapped, unsedated civilians. They did not commit their crimes in moments of berserk breakdown or temporary insanity. They committed them over and over again, for years—cunningly, creatively, and with a joyful sense of competition over who could do the most...
REVELATION | Craig R. Koester
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Revelation or the Apocalypse of John is one of the most provocative texts in the Bible. It has inspired great art and music, even as it has fueled speculation about the imminent end of the world. My study of Revelation asks how people have construed its meaning in such different ways, and it offers a way of reading it that is socially engaged and profoundly hopeful...
TO ENGINEER IS HUMAN, TO FORGIVE DESIGN | Henry Petroski
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The working title of my first book was 'What is Engineering?' I had begun asking that question of myself in earnest the late 1970s. At the time, I had earned three degrees in engineering; I had worked as an engineer; I was registered as a professional engineer; and I had taught engineering. Yet when a layperson neighbor or colleague in the humanities or social sciences asked me what engineers do, I could not complete an explanation before his or her eyes began to glaze over...
THE LOTTERY | Andrew Lodge | Art: Sara Germain
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I rounded the busy corner at the traffic circle, dodging the mass of humanity that slides through Delhi on any given morning. Between all the movement I caught a glimpse of him, and as I slipped forward through the crowds he came into full view. He sat propped up against the stone wall on one edge of the road, his body shrouded in a tattered saffron blanket and his head wrapped in a scarf, the same place and position and outfit as always. As I approached him, my eyes were involuntarily drawn to his decaying feet that habitually protruded from underneath the blanket. I often wondered if he did this deliberately, an extra sales pitch for the alms collection that was his pursuit and livelihood....
THE WORLD ON A CUP | Joseph Heathcott | Art: Ralph Steiner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I had my first taste of coffee from a glass mug featuring a Mercator projection map of the world. I was ten years old, seated at my grandparents' kitchen table. Grandma had ordered the mugs sometime in the early 1970s from Life magazine, which advertised them as a promotional offering from the Nestle corporation. Through the obloid glass, the scalding hot coffee looked like weak tea, and it offered only the barest hint of flavor. Quality was beside the point. It was all about getting grandpa ready for his long shift hauling freight in semi-truck and trailer...
THE LOUDEST NOISE | Elettra Pauletto | Art: Lucie Melahn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many who have spent some length of time in Rwanda will know that the place has a certain feel to it. Perhaps they can’t quite put their finger on it, and some might even ignore it – but one common observation persists: there is something sinister in the air. It might come from knowing that the genocide of 800,000 people took place in 1994, which is not so long ago. The killing was ferocious, and when it was over, the killers and victims went back to living side by side. 'Hi Neighbor'. Inevitably, they suffered from the memories of the genocide – either because of who they lost, what they did, or in many cases, both – and on top of that, they suffered from fear of revenge and repressed emotions. This repression was an executive order: the government insists that notions of ethnic identity and the competition for power between them gave rise to the genocide, and all discussion of ethnic differences was consequently banned. Identification cards detailing ethnic affiliation were taken out of use, and the few who publicly speak of separate ethnic groups – particularly when pointing out that moderate Hutus were killed alongside Tutsis during the genocide – are accused of supporting terrorism or espousing genocide ideology, both crimes that come with lengthy prison sentences yet hopelessly vague definitions. Still, everybody knows who is Hutu and who is Tutsi...
THE TRUTH ABOUT GAZA | Roy Cohen | Art: Banksy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I grew up and spent 22 years of my life in Ashdod, an Israeli city located 25 kilometers north of the place we call Gaza. I’ve lived for thirty years in total — and not a single time have I ever been to Gaza. No one in my family has ever been to Gaza. It has taken me some time—I admit, I can be slow—but I have finally figured out why: The Gaza Strip is not a real place.
AN INDEFATIGABLE AGENDA | Patrick Ross
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A bitter gale sliced its way through the heart of Amsterdam the night of February 22nd, 1672, causing "severe cold and dryness," the Hollandse Mercurius later recorded. Dryness is not what one desires when attempting to heat a large, open building filled with wood presses and paper. Dutch buildings in the 17th Century often were little warmer than the air outside. Fireplaces were essential on cold winter nights, even while the growing port city's residents knew flames were always capable of spreading beyond their brick-encased enclosures. But why would anyone be heating, at 3:30 a.m., not a private home, but the largest printing house in Europe?...
LETTERS | Stuart A. Kurtz | Art: Vicente Carducho
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Stuart A. Kurtz on Kirby Olson's article 'Marianne Moore and the Just War Tradition'
An Existential Encounter | Francis Kane
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The encounter with death has been a central theme in Western philosophy in general and in Existential philosophy in particular. The other boundary of human existence, birth, has been treated at best as a marginal phenomenon; at worst, completely ignored...
How I became an Existentialist | Fred Skolnik
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Before there was post-modernism, there was modernism. Before there was deconstructionism, there was existentialism. I belong to that earlier time...
Marianne Moore and the Just War Tradition | Kirby Olson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Presbyterian poet Marianne Moore comes out of a religious tradition that has been largely severed from the literary and artistic world...
Public Figures | John Wenke
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Before Amanda Bynes went loopy, we had never heard of her. Maybe we missed her on Oprah. Now that we think of it, she probably never went on Oprah...
Human Desperation and the Limits of Modern Medicine | Andrew Lodge
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The air was the hot and heavy sort common just before the monsoon. It had a peculiar mixture of industrial strength antiseptic combined with the usual village smells of blossoming flowers and rotting waste...
The Catholic Worker Movement in 2014: An Appreciation | Rosalie G. Riegle
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There’s an old prayer, attributed to St. Catherine of Siena: 'Thank you, God, for giving me what I didn’t know I needed.' The 'what' for me is the Catholic Worker movement, founded by Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin in 1932 and still on the planet, sturdy and strong in 2014...
Rumpus in The Middle East | A Conversation with Einat Wilf
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Einat Wilf was a member of the Knesset between 2010-2013, representing a break-away Labour party faction under Ehud Barak. A graduate of Harvard University, she holds a Ph.D. in political science from Wolfson College, University of Cambridge. Born and raised in Israel, she grew up in Jerusalem...
From Literature to Biterature | W.M. Osadnik
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Computers and literature, computers and art, computers and creative imagination—among hundreds of questions related to the relationship between human mind and machines, Peter Swirski also asks the most important one: under which conditions an intelligent computer would be capable of creative writing...
The big city as Garden of Eden | Stephanie V Sears
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Centuries of human endeavor including animal domestication, agriculture, market economy, industrialization, science, have come between the Garden of Eden and us. This regrettable separation has incited archeology to dig into a very distant past in search of this garden of our lost innocence, alleged...
Transforming Leviathan | T.S.Tsonchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
"Undisciplined" notes on Reinhold Niebuhr and Eric Voegelin...
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
THE MONTREAL REVIEW IS NOW ACCEPTING BOOK REVIEWS AND LONG-FORM CRITICAL ESSAYS ON SUBJECTS RELATED TO THE FIELDS OF THEOLOGY, PHILOSOPHY, POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC THEORY, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, HISTORY, ART AND LITERATURE. THE SUBMISSION DEADLINE FOR THE NEXT ISSUE IS DECEMBER 20th, 2014.
Toqueville's America | Fred Skolnik
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In May 1831, at the age of 25, Alexis de Tocqueville arrived in the United States as part of a commission of two to study the American prison system, returning to France nine months later to write up his report and start work on his famous Democracy in America...
Desire, Passion, and the Politics of Culture | Jerome A. Miller
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Thoughtful discourse about cultural politics is jeopardized by the intrusion of ideological abstractions. In an attempt to avoid them, I’ll begin with two personal anecdotes...
Reflections on Literary Craft | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I have an idea for a short story, but doubt my ability to pull it off. I haven’t written any stories since high school, where I received enough encouragement to convince me to apply to a fiction workshop in college and to a poetry workshop as a back-up...
How to Speak Weimar | Rudy Koshar
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In recent years 'Weimar-talk' has been an important part of American political pundits’ toolkit. Soon after September 11 it was common to regard George W. Bush’s 'War on Terror' as a modern version of Article 48, the constitutional provision authorizing temporary suspension of democratic liberties...
Following the Saints, Footfall by Footfall | Matthew R. Anderson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Several hills and valleys into my first day of walking the 100 km St. Cuthbert Way from Melrose Scotland to Holy Island, England, I stopped to check my bearings and time. I'd arrived at a point of decision. On a pilgrimage trail you might argue that every step is a point of decision, but on a map...
The Stillness of the Acropolis | Richard LeBlond
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In the spring of 1972, I headed from the States to Europe with that wave of young North Americans for whom an international adventure was an essential experience in the new era of personal growth...
An Attempt to Find the Catholic Worker Movement | Michael Nagel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My copy of 'Loaves and Fishes: The Story of the Catholic Worker Movement' is falling apart. There is almost nothing holding it together...
On Referendums | Matt Qvortrup and David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Québec referendums of 1980 and 1995, conducted by René Lévesque and Jacques Parizeau, were essentially a response to pressures from within the Parti Québécois, from party stalwarts not the electorate, which by tradition is the general motivation for conducting a referendum. Lévesque and Parizeau never thought they could win. The referendums were conceived as a lynchpin for holding the party together in its quest for political power...If a nationalist party wins a majority they have no choice but to call a referendum, even if they know they are going to lose.
Syria and The Power of Wrongdoing | James Gow
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Syria is awash with war crimes. The people suffer deliberatively inflicted hardship and harm. This is war marked by war crimess--the hallmark of the last three decades, where almost every armed conflict has been marked by strategies of war crimes. Syria is among the worst cases. Yet, those...
The Advent of Virtual Realism | Alexander Zubatov | Art Work by Andrew Stevovich
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Shields’ 2010 anti-novel Reality Hunger is a kind of 205-page manifesto composed of 618 brief numbered sections, the longest no more than a few pages, though most are limited to a few sentences. These passages are, by and large, uncited quotations from other authors.
What is Political Theology and Why Does it Matter? | Clayton Crockett
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 2003, Mark Lilla published his book The Stillborn God, that examines the tension between modern political philosophy and a more messianic political theology. Lilla claims that modern European thought has struggled with this tension between political theology and political philosophy over the last…
The Plebeian Experience | Martin Breaugh
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'The plebs' is the name of an experience, that of achieving human dignity through political agency. The plebs designates neither a social category nor an identity but rather a fundamental political event: the passage from a subpolitical status to one of a full-fledged political subject...
Giving Barbarism its Due: Commemorative Monuments in Germany | Rudy Koshar
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Since my first trip to Europe in the early 1970s I’ve seen Germany become not only the dominant financial power of the Continent but also a model for how to memorialize a violent past...
Fateful Decisions and Foreign Policy | Steve Yetiv
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many political scientists, economists and other social scientists, as well as your average layperson, have tended to assume that human beings are rational. Yet, scholars of cognitive psychology have demonstrated in experiments that rationality is sometimes elusive; that our decisions are impacted by many mental shortcuts that contribute to bad decisions; and that decisionmaking, while often reasonably accurate, is also frequently clouded by biases...
The Camps | Alicia DeFonzo
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
They traveled north through the city of Weimar and approached the compound at daybreak. It was overcast, and ash sat atop the lofty barbed wire barrier...
The Theology of Catharsis: Love and Action | T.S.Tsonchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Love is a strong, problematic word, especially put against another word, action. Love and action are like two worlds, separated by abyss. We speak about them with passion and conviction, but do we practice them together? This was the question that Hannah Arendt and Karl Barth were concerned most writing their books on God and human condition. This is the question that the good man asks himself after witnessing his failure to either love but not act or act but not love
Marianne Moore and the Poetics of the Protestant Work Ethic | Kirby Olson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In Money and Modernity: Pound, Williams and the Spirit of Jefferson, scholar Alec Marsh traces the economic theories that ran through the work of modernist poets...
Conscious Evolution | Lisa Kretz
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
We are always cloaked in what has come before. But for decades I have held close to my heart a belief I discovered in Helene Cixous' Laugh of the Medusa...
A New Cold War? | Steve Yetiv
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Peace, jobs, and prosperity in the 21st century may hinge partly on positive relations between the United States and China. And that raises a critical question: Will these countries get into a new cold war of dangerous tensions, harking back to U.S.-Soviet relations in the 20th century? And how can...
Egypt: The Fall of Mohammad Morsi, Ethics and a Shakespearean Question | Hamid Elyassi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In February 2011, President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt resigned after the armed forces sided with several thousand protesters who had gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square to demand his removal. With the probable exception of those who still supported Mubarak, replacing him with a military government was...
Power Without Violence: A Lesson from Tribal Communism | Darko Suvin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As dawn arises in the Mbya tribe, one of the last remnants of the once large group of the Tupi- Guarani Amerindians, in the jungle of large trees inside what is now Paraguay, very often a pa’i, a prophet-singer, rises...
Conspiracy and the Death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy | Binoy Kampmark
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An American president, feted as the inviolable creature of Camelot, accompanied by a pristine, porcelain wife and a sense of opportunity, is felled by an assassin while touring Dallas on November 22, 1963...
Woody Allen and Wealth | Lisa Szefel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Jokes, jazz, psychoanalysis, sex, magic, Manhattan: scholars, critics, and commentators have scrutinized the obsessions and influences of Woody Allen's films, but his relationship to wealth remains largely unplumbed...
Mind, Brain, and Free Will | Richard Swinburne
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many thinkers of recent decades have told us that science shows that humans are merely complicated machines, and that our actions are almost totally predetermined by our brain states, themselves predetermined by our genes and environment...
Rabelais’ Brother John: Humor and Humanism | Leonard M. Ares
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
François Rabelais was born towards the end of the 15 th century near Chinon, France. After receiving an education in French Catholic schools, he became a monk in the Order of St. Benedict, later going on to study medicine. In 1532, he published Pantagruel, followed in 1534 by Gargantua...
Frère Jean: portrait de la personne idéale selon Rabelais | Leonard M. Ares
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Rabelais est né vers la fin du XV siècle près de Chinon. Après avoir reçu une formation dans les couvents catholiques français, il est devenu moine dans l'Ordre de Saint-Benoît, autrement dit l'Ordre des Bénédictins...
Letter from Tokyo: Contemplating Tea Bowls | Paul Schollmeier
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Tea bowls are alive! Were I to assert this proposition in causal conversation with you, you might well think that I had been imbibing something a wee bit stronger than tea...
Are You Thinking about Taking a Cruise? | Eileen Flynn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Is it reasonable to defend a corporate policy which shouts 'Gotcha!' to the vacationer who balks at boarding a cruise ship due to hurricane conditions and requests a refund? Many instances of corporate wrongdoing have been uncovered due to whistleblowers. When the whistleblower is a customer, not a company insider, how likely is it that he or she will be able to be a change agent?
An Interview with Etgar Keret | Julia Edelman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The first time I read a short story by Etgar Keret, I was working at Symphony Space, a performing arts center in New York....
Baby Shower | Short story by Matt Domino
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Giants had just won the Super Bowl and the spring semester was underway. The forecast had called for snow...
The Legacy of Tiananmen Square | Michel Cormier
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
More than twenty years later, the legacy of Tiananmen Square remains, an unsolved problem. The prominent names in the struggle, such as Wang Juntao, the mentor of the student leaders, or Wang Dan, leader of the Tiananmen student movement, live for the most part in exile in the United States, Europe, Hong Kong, or Taiwan...
China’s Facelift: Economic Development and Political Transition | Hamid Elyassi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In March this year, the moulting of the political structure of the People's Republic of China was completed at the annual plenary session of the National People's Congress and the old faces at the top politely offered their seats to their younger colleagues...
Darwin and Dogma: On Leiter and Weisberg’s Review of Mind and Cosmos | Alex Sztuden
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In September of 2012, the eminent philosopher Thomas Nagel published a calm and dispassionate book challenging the reigning scientific orthodoxy of the day. In his book Mind and Cosmos, Nagel argues that the current materialist, neo-Darwinian explanatory model cannot account for the existence of consciousness, reason and value...
Essays for a Counter-Revolutionary Time | Darko Suvin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1956, in the dead-end of the Cold War, Horkheimer and Adorno embarked on recorded discussions in view of a new version of the Communist Manifesto for the new times (just as Brecht had in 1944 felt the need to renew it for the age of world wars and in hexameter form)...
The Wright Brothers: Right or Wrong | Binoy Kampmark
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The controversy over whether the Wright Brothers were, in fact, the first humans to take to flight on December 17, 1903 in the famed Kitty Hawk in North Carolina has been an enduring one...
Likeness: autobiographical essays by Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In our house a hallway ran the length of the second floor, ending at my mother's bedroom. Standing outside my room, I could look down the hall and see whether her door was open, meaning that she was awake and receiving visitors, and whether one of my five siblings was sitting in the chair facing her bed...
Tea with the Vicar, or the Pleasures of Light English Fiction | Robert Boucheron
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Some things never go out of style. This means, of course, comic novels published in England in the first half of the twentieth century. Unfortunately, they do go out of print...
Emile Nelligan, “un Dante d’une époque déchue” | Maja Nazaruk
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A l'époque de son apogée, Emile Nellighan était un jeune gamin subtil et frileux, intellectuel mais pas livresque, aliénée par sa profonde solitude et angoissé par le manque de discours avec ses ainés...
The Green Economy | Molly Scott-Cato
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Britain, and the EU generally, is in the throes of a crisis of confidence in its food supply. The largely unregulated and highly competitive process of producing what ends up on our plates has been offering evidence of poor quality, dishonest labelling, and probably criminal fraud...
Political Emotion: From Pride to Envy and Beyond | Jerome Neu
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The emotions at the heart of contemporary American political discourse have undergone a dramatic shift. For decades, it was all about pride...
Adam Smith, Markets, and Virtues | Ryan Patrick Hanley
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Gains and losses; costs and benefits. Thinking in these terms comes naturally to most of us today. And for this we largely have economists to thank...
The Decline of Democracy | Joshua Kurlantzick
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
After the end of Cold War in the early 1990s, the new millennium sees a return of autocracy and decline of democracy worldwide.
The Character of U.S.-China Relations | Dong Wang
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The 'Chinese dream' (Zhongguo meng), put forth by the new leader Xi Jinping, aspires to match the American dream. Before we dismiss it as just another copycat slogan, let us consider that in history, glorifying labels have often switched owners. At least China does not claim to be God's own country. Just yet.
National Identities and Bilateral Relations in East Asia | Gilbert Rozman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Gilbert Rozman on National Identities and Bilateral Relations: Widening Gaps in East Asia and Chinese Demonization of the United States.
Passive and Assertive Secularism | Ahmet T. Kuru
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
State policies on religion are the result of ideological struggles between the defenders of two types of secularism. In the US, the dominant ideology is 'passive secularism,' which allows public visibility of religion. The dominant ideology in France and Turkey, in contrast, is 'assertive secularism,' which aims to confine religion to the private domain and to exclude it from the public sphere. Other cases where assertive secularism is dominant include Mexico, while passive secularism is dominant in such cases as India and the Netherlands...
Jenny and the Base: South Korea in the early 2000s
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
SEOUL, Republic of Korea (ROK), June 2001. For reasons of security photography in Kimpo Airport is forbidden. The drive into the city crosses the massive rust-colored Songson Bridge. It was a wet Wednesday evening. Heavy traffic, non-descript post WW2 high rises. Red, green, and blue the preferred colours, a second look revealed some browns and pinks...
The Future of the Korean Peninsula | Sam Noumoff
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The recent visit of Dennis Rodman and members of the Harlem Globetrotters to North Korea raises the spectre of Ping-Pong diplomacy in the normalization of relations between China and the U.S. Tragically, this is an unlikely parallel...
Baikonur Cosmodrome: Space Junk | David Mould
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Just off the main drag in Karaganda, a coal mining and industrial city in northern Kazakhstan, the EcoMuseum is housed on the first floor of a local government administration building. You have to know where you're going because there's no sign on the street, and only a small one on the door...
The Necktie and the Human Condition: One Man’s Story | Michael Jackson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Class, today's topic is: The world is divided into two kinds of people: those who wear neckties and those who comment on those who wear neckties. Discuss...
The Maiden of Ludmir | Eric Maroney
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Traditional Judaism severely curtailed the role women could play in the arena of religious duties. Women were viewed as necessarily limited by biology, as Jewish law considered women unclean during menstruation and for a certain time following childbirth. In fact, anyone even touching such a woman was considered unclean...
The Life of Leonard Cohen | Manini Sheker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Leonard Cohen once remarked: 'the kind of thing I like is that you write a song, and it slips into the world, and they forget who wrote it. And it moves and it changes, and you hear it again 300 years later, some women washing their clothes in a stream, and one of them is humming this tune.' While none of his songs might have achieved quite such broad popularity, his work has indeed proved curiously malleable to varied interpretation...
Zero Dark Thirty: Heroism, Torture and Propaganda | Gary Kern
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The phrase Zero Dark Thirty is mysterious and ominous, but meaningless to anyone unfamiliar with the lingo of the United States Armed Forces. Kathryn Bigelow, director of the film with this title, explained on the CBS This Morning show that Zero Dark Thirty is a military term designating thirty minutes past midnight. Neither she nor screenwriter Mark Boal chose to reveal this meaning in the film, so moviegoers were left in the dark. That apparently was the desired effect...
Oil and Grand Strategy | Robert Vitalis
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Neo-mercantilism is alive and well 100 years later, as we see in the press, speeches in Congress, and in the recent US presidential debates, where promises of an elusive 'energy independence' echoed once more...
Dwight Macdonald's Masscult and Midcult in the Age of Waste | Zach Dorfman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1960, Dwight Macdonald published 'Masscult and Midcult' in the Partisan Review. Here Macdonald introduced his distinction between what he called masscult—or what is more commonly labeled 'lowbrow'—and midcult, which we generally refer to as 'middlebrow.' He identified the characteristics of both forms of culture in America, contrasting them with what used to be known as culture, full stop, but what is today called high culture...
The Evolution and History of Marxism | Darko Suvin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For the last quarter of a century we have been witnessing an understandable, although unsavoury, spectacle that can be called 'poisoning the wells.' Wells are poisoned in war so that no one should drink from them, and the victorious turbo-capitalism fears that Marxism might nonetheless raise one of its nine hydra heads again and obstruct the profitable democide and ecocide. That is why, to the reasonable contradictions that can (and must) be articulated within Marxism, tons of garbage are added in order to poison it. This article is, therefore, a minor act of hygiene...
The Coptic Popes | Nelly van Doorn-Harder
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On November 18, 2012, history was made when Tawadros II was crowned the 118th Coptic Pope in a lineage that started around the year 49 CE, when Mark the Evangelist arrived in Alexandria...
Trust and Society | Bruce Schneier
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Most of us recognize this: that it's not in our long-term best interest to act in our short-term self-interest. But not everyone does. That's why we need mechanisms to induce trust. That's why we need security. And that's what Liars and Outliers is about...
Virginia Woolf, Buddhism, and Lee's Biography of the Artist | A. B. Morgan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I've been reading Virginia Woolf since high school, and with more focus and intensity in the past five years. It was when I read The Waves for the first time, while living in Thailand and studying Buddhism, that I had an epiphany: not only was I a Buddhist, but Virginia Woolf was too!
An Analysis of John Donne | by Riley H. Welcker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
John Donne has engaged the minds of poets and literary critics for centuries, but what makes him so engaging? Is it the play and paradox of his verse, the audacity of his meter, the range of complexity with which he grapples the world around him? Whatever the case, Donne has proven to be a complex character...
On Poe's Pym | Bob Williams
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Let us now exhume the corpse of Edgar Allen Poe's The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. I will bring this work into the light from the dark recessed dungeons of scholarly contention, steal its meaning from under the haughty upturned nose of self-indulgent and absurd origins. Pym is not about a man tapping into his right brain in search of... art (Canada), it's not about King Solomon and Jerusalem (Kopley), it is not about slavery or hell...
An American in Paris | Christopher Flynn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
You can swallow the 'gout du bonheur' for only five Euros at L'as du fallafel in the Rue de Rosiers in the Marais in Paris. The taste of happiness...
A Re-Reading of Edmund in Shakespeare's King Lear | Race Capet
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
King Lear's Edmund surely ranks among the most despised figures of Shakespearean drama and is often held up as a villain par excellence. A close reading of I.ii and V.iii, however, reveals Edmund in a very different light...
Hurt Talk: Neil LaBute's Plays | D. J. Lee
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Like his predecessors, LaBute creates characters who are psychologically damaged, but what distinguishes LaBute is his obsessive focus on misogyny. It's hard to find a LaBute play that doesn't feature a man who has cruelly dumped a woman and a woman who has never gotten over it. This is a problem if you accept that playwrights and directors dictate our literary tastes as much as they reflect them...
Life, Poetry, Wisdom | Justice James Clarke
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When my wife Mary and I got married in 1961, the future looked golden. She gave up a promising career as a fashion illustrator to raise a family. I pursued a law career that culminated in my appointment to the bench in 1983. Our children were happy, healthy and bright...
Listening to Neil Young in All the Wrong Places: A Southern Rock Memoir | Terry Barr
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'Stay out the way, it's a Southern Thing,' sings Patterson Hood of The Drive-By Truckers. Of course, Hood's is not the only voice warning that outsiders won't ever 'get' this 'Southern thing.' Plenty of insiders like me don't get it either. I love the Truckers, have all their records...
Montreal Art and Literature Events, March, 2013: Rawi Hage
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Dialogues with Rawi Hage at St. James United Church...
American Exceptionalism, American Freedom | Eric Foner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Patriotism, to quote George Bernard Shaw, 'is your conviction that this country is superior to all others because you were born in it.' The same may be said of American exceptionalism...
Financial Market and Ethics: Why Ethics Matter | Eileen P. Flynn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It would be a serious error to think the financial crisis resulted from a glitch in the market for mortgage backed securities, or flaws in computer programs at credit rating agencies, or the failure of government regulators to read between lines of fine print...
The U.S.-Saudi Alliance and the Changing Dynamics of Oil | Thomas W. Lippman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The peculiar alliance between the United States and Saudi Arabia, forged during World War II and lubricated by oil, is being reshaped by dramatic shifts in global petroleum markets.Saudi Arabia's rulers and strategic planners in Washington still find each other useful, especially in confronting Iran, but they no longer need each other as they did in the past...
Syria's Thirty Years War | Interviews with Edward Luttwak and Faisal Alazem
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Edward Luttwak: I don't know anyone willing to do anything about Syria in the sense of knocking off Assad, which we could do in one day of air strikes...
Architecture: The Dream House | Robert Boucheron
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In an essay called 'Among the Ruins' about three twentieth-century writers, Bruce Chatwin writes, 'On the island of Capri there lived three narcissists who each built a house on the edge of a cliff. They were Axel Munthe, Baron Jacques Adelsward-Fersen and Curzio Malaparte. All three were writers of the self-dramatizing variety. All had a strong dose of Nordic sensibility. And all sought to expand their personalities in architecture...'
A Jarry Park Education | Tim Lehnert
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I made my Jarry Park debut at night, on a YMCA day-camp sponsored outing. The stadium felt alive, charged and vivid. The brilliant light towers, whose bulbs I tried to count, brought the grass, the warning track, and the white button-like bases into sharp relief. Night meant sophistication and excitement, an invitation to partake of the grown-up world...
Buckwild and Downton Abbey: TV's Social Reality
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It's a long way, in geographical distance and creative quality, from the down and dirty world of MTV's reality show hit Buckwild to the rarefied world of U.S. public television's Downton Abbey, but the two TV series have one thing in common, apart from having their new season premieres within a week in January 2013. Both perpetuate social and class stereotypes...
Hey Website Makers, Shape Up | By Steve Yetiv
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The other day, when stuck on a website dealing with my research area, global energy security, a thought hit me: am I website challenged--unable to navigate the increasingly complex internet sites on the Wild Wild Web...?
Art: Chris Burden's Metropolis II
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is currently exhibiting Chris Burden's Metropolis II, a 20-by-30 foot, multi-storied installation circulating 1,100 toy cars about 100 times over 18 traffic ways at scale speeds of 230-240 mph each hour...
Invaiatura | Short story by Joel Burcat
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There's a word that the winemakers here use, it's 'invaiatura'-the moment when the grapes change color, they stop growing and begin ripening...
The Heart of Florence | Short story by Yarrott Benz
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It was Lee Leffert who convinced my parents that I should be taken seriously as an artist. He was the bachelor brother of the next-door neighbors on Tyne Boulevard in Nashville. Tall, athletic, and erudite, Lee visited his family once a year from the Midwest, where he was the founder and headmaster of an exclusive private school...
Lucky Lady | Short story by Stefanie Levine Cohen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It's been fifteen years now that I've been changing the dining room chandelier light bulbs. Fifteen years of paying the bills and sitting in the driver's seat of the large blue Buick and cooking for one. Fifteen years since making the bed meant smoothing the covers and plumping the pillow on my side only...
Normal Accidents | Charles Perrow
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The immense complexity of some industrial organizations and their tight internal connections occasionally allowed even some small local failures, inevitable in complex systems, to cascade through the system and bring it down. If the system also had catastrophic potential, perhaps it should not exist...
Global Corruption | Laurence Cockcroft
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Recent scandals in Canada, laid bare by Quebec's Charbonneau Commission and the press, have shown how a tight network of city bosses, construction kings and political fund raisers can determine the award of major contracts and the financial power of political parties...
Can America’s Oil Boom Free It of Persian Gulf? | Steve Yetiv
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A recent report by the International Energy Agency concluded that the United States will displace Saudi Arabia as the world's largest oil producer by 2020. If that does occur, what would it mean for U.S. foreign policy? In particular, could America withdraw from the oil-rich Persian Gulf?
Capital, Coercion, and Post-Communist states | Gerald M. Easter
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The post-communist transitions are over. Socialism's command economy was successfully dismantled, but unexpected and distorted forms of capitalism arose in its place, often of a thuggish character, more freebooter than free market. And, finally, the transitions gave rise to very different types of post-communist states, bearing little likeness to the ideal liberal state...
What Makes A City Great? | Christopher Kennedy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The historical evidence shows that cities progress through three early phases – as centres of commerce, centres of industry, and then transportation hubs – before becoming financial centres...
Machiavellian Intelligence in Primates and Machiavelli | M. Jackson and D. Grace
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Since death Niccolo Machiavelli has had a long career in the popular culture. His name spawned the adjective ‘Machiavellian' and the noun ‘Machiavellianism.' Not a week passes but that some journalist espies a Machiavellian and detects Machiavellianism in others... Machiavelli has also been conscripted into primatology – the study of monkeys and their kind. We argue that this use of Machiavelli's name does him an injustice. What do we want? We want primatologists to stop monkeying around with his name. To make our appeal to common decency we recount how Machiavelli, though no fault of his own, came to the planet of the apes.
The Soviet Union - Federation or Empire? | Tania Raffass
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Few people in the West believed during the Cold War that the USSR was what its founders and leaders thought it to be. Lenin and Stalin designed it as a new type of federation – a union of ethnic nations or nation-states. Its Union Republics in their turn were also partitioned into ethnic homelands with varying levels of cultural autonomy...
Islamic Capitalism and Finance: Origins, Evolution and the Future | Murat Cizakca
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For a millennium, from the seventh to the seventeenth century, Muslims controlled the intercontinental and transoceanic trade between Europe and the Indian Ocean. While doing this, they also created one of the greatest civilizations of the world. They owed this success to a unique economic system: Islamic capitalism...
Why I Emigrated from America | Joseph Grim Feinberg
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Not long after I moved away from the United States, a college student was arrested in Louisiana for burning an American flag. He was protesting the extra-judicial killing of Osama bin Laden. As one might expect, a patriotic crowd soon gathered to protest the flag burning, and one of them was filmed on YouTube shouting, 'If you’re not proud to be an American, then get out!..'
Eating Angels | Sarah A. Odishoo
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry in prose by Sarah A. Odishoo
What Is Poetry | Juan Tomas
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
To consider a question such as what is poetry, is tantamount to asking what art is, or what is music...
War Photography | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Museum of Fine Arts Houston's exhibition 'WAR PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath' includes a photo of a dead man's lower limbs, stocking feet in loafers, the shot chopped off just above the ankles...
Best of 2012 in TMR: Truly Social
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Mark Pagel on the origins of the human social mind, Kent Flannery and Joyce Marcus on the creation of inequality, Melvyn L. Fein on human hierarchies, Michael Tomasello on cooperation, Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis on human reciprocity and its evolution, Marco Iacoboni on the science of how we connect with others, Simon Baron-Cohen on empathy and origins of cruelty, David Livingstone Smith on dehumanization, Alex Mesoudi on cultural evolution, Mel Thompson on how did I become Me
Dear Reader, Once a year we ask for your support...
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Dear Reader, Once a year we ask for your support. We need your help to continue publishing and promoting some of the world's best authors and their ideas. Presently, the revenue we receive is insufficient to make the Review a self-sustainable publication, so your help really matters. If you are able and wish to make a donation, please consult our 'Donations' page at: http://www.themontrealreview.com/donate.php We want to thank you for being with us. Your loyalty is what makes us happy, proud, and audacious to continue publishing. In 2013, we will try to keep the magazine interesting, informative, diverse, and useful. If you wish to suggest authors, topics, and ideas that you think deserve attention, please write to us at themontrealreview@gmail.com . Sincerely, The Montreal Review Team
Why Capitalism? | Allan H. Meltzer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The critics of capitalism are wrong. As long as people value freedom and growth, some form of capitalism will remain the principal way to organize economies. Political choice will force deviations from time to time, but a free public will find its way back. Capitalism will remain our future. And because we are not perfect, our system will have flaws. Freedom will permit critics to voice their criticisms, successfully at times.
Neoclassical, Keynesian, and Marxian Economy | Wolff and Resnick
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In most societies, economic literacy encompassing the contending theories was neglected over recent decades in and by the one-sided curricula and particular theories prevalent in schools, media, business, and politics. We must now correct for that neglect...
Historical Memory in Chinese Politics and Foreign Relations | Zheng Wang
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For many, China can rise peacefully only after it has changed from a communist dictatorship to a multiparty democracy, where officials are chosen in regular elections. However, without liberation from the powerful complex of historical myth and trauma, I worry that a multiparty democracy could lead China into a dangerous development. This is because history and memory issues can be easily used by nationalist leaders as tools for mobilization or for generation of conflicts between a newly democratic China and its old enemies...
History of East Asia: The Sinosphere, Past and Present | Joshua A. Fogel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Pre-mid-nineteenth-century relations in East Asia were decidedly not based on a system of equal, interacting nation-states who contracted treaties regulating their political and economic intercourse. They were hierarchical with the ruling dynastic house on the mainland ('China') receiving visitors from the archipelago ('Japan') and from the many statelets along the peninsula ('Korea'), as well as elsewhere in the region.
What has Athens to do with Jerusalem? | Miriam Leonard
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?' This famous cry of the early Christian Tertullian was answered in the nineteenth century with a resounding response of 'Everything!'...
Plato's Republic: Philosophers by Nature, by Design, and Socratic | Roslyn Weiss
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It is reasonably assumed that all philosophers in Plato's 'Republic' are the same, and yet, arguably, they are not...
Successful Privatization: Lessons from Britain | David Parker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The lessons learned from the British privatization. David Parker on his Official History of Privatization
Fiduciary Law | Tamar Frankel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Some subjects 'grow on you.' They keep recurring in the materials you read, and the stories you hear. Perhaps these subjects crop-up because you think about them. For me, fiduciary law is one of these subjects. In early 1970s I worked on a treatise: The Regulation of Money Managers, focusing on investment advisers and mutual funds...
The Americans | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
GLENN Miller is probably the University of Colorado's most famous alumnus. Up on a wall in the Glenn Miller Ballroom, scene of square dances sexier than all the tangos of Argentina, hangs a huge likeness of the man...
Visiting Uncle Shirley | Terry Barr
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My Uncle Shirley left our home in Alabama as a Jewish salesman, and turned up in rural South Carolina as a Baptist preacher. Of course, we didn't realize that last fact until we heard it at his funeral eulogy. The rest of his life was shrouded in an even deeper mystery...
Pool | Matt Domino
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short Story by Matt Domino
Jakub Dolejs | Art Mur Gallery
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
That a photographer's guile can make for a heady and instructive aesthetic experience is proved by the remarkable work of Jakub Dolejs. His ongoing practice of deception now encompasses some of the formal language of late Modernism, and his palette is almost hallucinatory in its clarity...
The Linked Recessions of the 1970s and Early Twenty-First Century | Judith Stein:
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
People trying to understand the Great Recession often look back to the Great Depression. Nevertheless, because the economy of the 1930s was self-contained, its dynamics are unlike those of the contemporary economy. A better way to understand the Great Recession is to link it with the recession of 1970s.
The Founders and Finance: How Hamilton, Gallatin, and Other Immigrants Forged a New Economy | Thomas McCraw
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The United States government started out on a shoestring and almost immediately went bankrupt. To fight its war of Independence from Britain, it borrowed from banks in Holland and wheedled large sums from France, Britain’s great rival...
Moral Behavior, Trust, and Markets | James Halteman and Edd Noell
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When Adam Smith promoted a market economy in the mid 18th century it was in the context of a moral theory that depended upon personal interaction. In those days the interests of small business entrepreneurs were best served by quality products and service for their customers who rewarded them with repeat business. In many areas of the market today the same strategy applies, but technology, shipping speed and the globalization of markets are testing the interpersonal foundation of trust upon which markets must depend...
The Culture of Dishonesty and the Importance of Moral Behavior in Economy | Tamar Frankel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
What is so important about morality, especially in economics? And why is a culture of honesty crucial to the well-being of society?
Faith and Reason or Expressing Faith and Being Reasonable | Robert Wuthnow
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Criticisms arguing that religion is irrational have been voiced in recent years by writers such as Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Christopher Hitchens, and Sam Harris. How is it possible, they ask, for so many people who otherwise claim to be reasonable to be religious? How indeed?
Liu An's Art of War | Andrew Seth Meyer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
During the first century of the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.E.-220 C.E.), an imperial prince, Liu An (d. 122 B.C.E.), gathered together a group of scholars at his court in Huainan, in modern-day Anhui Province . He oversaw a large literary enterprise that produced numerous writings, one of which survives intact: the Huainanzi or Master of Huainan...
Red Summer: The Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic | Bernard Quetchenbach
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It's been a splendid July day in Yellowstone. Cara and I have hiked through a blaze of wildflowers...
Alain Badiou's 'In Praise of Love' | Rodney Dubey
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Badiou's new definition of love, which is at the heart of his new book 'In Praise of Love', sounds like something very old, although stated in a novel way...
The Rise and Decline of a Ponzi: "On Chasing Madoff" | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy on Jeff Prosserman's film 'Chasing Madoff'
The Car Culture in America | Leigh Donaldson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
One of my most enduring childhood memories is when my father brought home a battery-operated car dashboard panel designed to simulate the experience of driving...
Parable of the Seawall | Mathias B. Freese
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An excerpt from 'This Mobius Strip of Ifs' by Mathias B. Freese
Russian Business Culture | David A.Dyker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Why Is Russia So Different?
Québec 2012: Electorate In An Ice Cream Parlour
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Marcel Martel: It was not a pro PQ vote. We know that more or less 69 percent of the population voted for a party other than the Liberals. I can't name a single political commentator who was not surprised by the outcome. I did not buy the argument that the Liberals would be destroyed. However, I was quite surprised that they managed to elect fifty members...
How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society | Brad S. Gregory
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Brad S. Gregory on his book 'The Unintended Reformation'
Why Religion is Natural and Science Is Not | Robert N. McCauley
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Suggesting that natural science is unnatural and that religion, which traffics in the supernatural, is natural seems to turn things upside down. Sorting out these paradoxes, though, will offer insight about both enterprises...
Why We Demean, Enslave, and Exterminate Others | By David Livingstone Smith
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'Less Than Human' is a book about dehumanization. It is widely recognized that dehumanization plays an important role facilitating acts of violence in genocide, war, and other forms of atrocity. Given this it is surprising to learn that scant attention has been paid to it in the scholarly literature. Scholarly literature on dehumanization is shockingly thin on the ground...
U.S. Mexico Cross-Border Murders | Lawrence Weiner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many Americans view Mexico as a nation of unrelenting bloodshed, where decapitated heads are rolled into nightclubs and mutilated corpses show up overnight on the roadside. Since 2006, when the government began its war on drug traffickers, more than 60,000 people have been killed. But Mexicans see their northern neighbor as awash in violence, too...
Keynes and Hayek | T.S.Tsonchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Today, the world faces another big economic challenge. The works and legacy of both Keynes and Hayek are explored once again, and once again we are not sure who of them gives us the right answer. Should we spend, as Keynes advised, since spending has brought us to the edge of financial collapse, or should we leave the economy to heal itself naturally, as Hayek believed, since deregulation caused the bankruptcy of the financial system?
Getting a story published in The New Yorker? | David B. Comfort
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
What does it take to get into the New Yorker and what are the odds?
The Power of Proconsuls in Rome and America | Carnes Lord
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In his book 'Proconsuls: Delegated Political-Military Leadership from Rome to America Today' Carnes Lord argues that the old Roman imperial institution of proconsulship is still useful for America, but only if it is applied according the realities of the day.
The Elizabethans | Malcolm Forbes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Malcolm Forbes on A.N.Wilson's book "The Elizabethans"
Father John Misty | A conversation with Josh Tillman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Matt Domino speaks with Josh Tillman (Father John Misty)
In Aleppo | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy speaks with Sakhr Al-Makhadhi
Walls | Marcello Di Cintio
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In December 1999, hot with millennial fever and desperate to be somewhere 'important' when the clock turned on 2000, I traveled to Jerusalem. On Christmas Eve during that trip, I walked from Jerusalem to Bethlehem. The journey was far less biblically-epic than it sounds...
Losses | Robert Wexelblatt
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An excerpt from Robert Wexelblatt's new book 'Losses'
Oscar Wilde Christianity | Simon Critchley
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The infinite ethical demand allows us to become the subjects of which we are capable by dividing us from ourselves, by forcing us to live in accordance with an asymmetrical and unfulfillable demand, say the demand to be Christlike, while knowing that we are all too human. Although we can be free of the limiting externalism of conventional morality, established law, and the metaphysics of traditional religion, it seems that we will never be free of that 'sordid necessity of living for others.' The latter requires an experience of faith, a faith of the faithless that is an openness to love, love as giving what one does not have and receiving that over which one has no power.
Sin in history and Christianity | Paula Fredriksen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The idea of ‘sin’ suits its times, argues Paula Fredriksen in her new book ‘Sin: The Early History of an Idea’.
Reasoning and Conversation | Anthony Simon Laden
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Anthony Simon Laden on his book 'Reasoning: A Social Picture'
Animals and the Human Imagination | Linda Simon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The greatest breach in nature, philosopher William James wrote in 1890, 'is the breach from one mind to another...'
American Utopia and Social Engineering | David Livingstone Smith
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Review of Peter Swirski's 'American Utopia and Social Engineering in Literature, Social Thought, and Political History'
Human Hierarchies | Melvyn L. Fein
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
If human societies are to be modified in directions more people find fulfilling, this can only occur if the nature of human hierarchies is acknowledged and understood. This search is a worthy endeavor to which the social sciences ought apply themselves without committing to a preferred moral outcome...
Karl Marx | Paul Thomas
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It is no doubt easier to imagine a world without Marx than a world without revolution, capitalism, communism and socialism. But in the world we actually inhabit, these still have to be seen through Marx...
Addicted to Profit | Stuart Sim
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It is one thing to strive to make a profit out of your skills and talents, something else entirely to indulge in profiteering or to assume that absolutely every area of your life must yield a financial profit...
Carpe Something | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Three poems from Michael Milburn's new book 'Carpe Something'
The Zionist Entity and the Occupation | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In August 1967, soon after the Six Day War, the Arab League met in Khartoum, three nos the response to Israel's offer to trade land for peace: no negotiations, no recognition, no peace...
Novel of Consciousness and the World System | Jenny Morse
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The contemporary novel has many tools available to it in order to construct its work. Novels are meant to create their own plausible and realistic worlds wherein events take place and characters develop. These stories are told from many perspectives, the third-person narrator perhaps still the most popular. However, the most intimate means of engagement in the novel might be the novel of consciousness, which narrates from within the protagonist's mind.
Conquest in Space: Dreaming about Mars | Binoy Kampmark
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
With NASA's latest efforts on Mars with the Curiosity rover, humanity is now bracing itself for the hope of finding life past, present or future, on a distant plant. Much of this is drivel, suggesting a continued obsession of humankind's 'inner child' ('We discover ourselves through discovering others') but the prospects are intriguing. Colonising Mars will enable us to export rapacity and problems and possibly unearth a few scientific gems on the way...
Spectres of Derrida | Richard Kreitner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Occupy Wall Street and the Politics of Deconstruction
North Korea's Natural Resources
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Paradoxically, the promise of Kim Jong-Il might soon come true and North Korea may become a 'rich and prosperous state' – rich in natural resources and empowered by nuclear technologies.
Prepurposed Churches in Montreal | Mark Lavorato
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Photo Essay
Macy Gray
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An Interview With Grammy-Award winning singer-songwriter, Macy Gray.
The Chinese Growth Model Before and After the Financial Crisis | Nicholas Lardy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There is a growing risk that China's economic growth could slow substantially in the medium term.  This would not be the so-called hard landing, which implies a near term sharp slowdown followed by a v-shaped recovery, but rather a prolonged period of slow growth perhaps something around 4 percent, the onset of which might be within two to three years...
Does Imperialism Have a Future? | Leo Blanken
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'Imperialism' is an evocative word. It summons images of grim Roman legions marching through German forests, Maxim machine guns cutting down hordes of Dervishes at Omdurman, or scenes of torture from the classic French film 'Battle of Algiers.' These images share two attributes: they are noxious and they are historical – as Tennyson might describe them, 'portions and parcels of the dreadful past.' But is this, indeed, the case?
Moscow Supports Kim Jong-un | Leonid Petrov
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
This year Russia experienced the return of the Kremlin veteran, Vladimir Putin, to the presidential seat. Although he is associated with political reaction and is concerned by the prospect of 'colour revolutions' at home, Russia is desperately running out of friends on the international stage...Belarus, Iran, the countries of Shanghai Cooperation Organization, and now North Korea, have all received special treatment from the increasingly anti-Western Russia
The Copernican Question | Robert S. Westman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1543, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) publicly defended the hypothesis that the earth is a planet and the sun a body resting near the center of a finite universe. But why did Copernicus make this bold proposal? And why did it matter?
The Origins of Morality | Dennis L. Krebs
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many people, laypeople and scholars alike, assume that the kinds of dispositions that inevitably prevail in the process of biological evolution must be selfish and immoral, rendering humans and other animals bad by nature... However, this idea is misguided because there are significant differences between selfish genes and selfish individuals.
Learning in the Franciscan Order | Neslihan Senocak
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In his Discourse on the 'Origins of Social Inequality,' Jean Jacques Rousseau identified private property, money and inheritance laws as the chief factors in the creation and maintenance of social inequality in European civilization. But his wisdom was incomplete. He would have benefited from reading the second 'Life of Francis of Assisi', written by Thomas of Celano in 1246...
On Courage | Richard Avramenko
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Courage, I suggest, is the willingness to risk life and limb for the sake of something. In other words, courage reveals what we care about...
The Murder of the Rosenbergs | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy on the Rosenbergs and Walter Schneir's 'Final Verdict: What Really Happened in the Rosenberg Case'
Oktoberfest: A “Stammtisch” Of Thousands | Steven Hill
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The German language has a word, 'Stammtisch,' that really has no English equivalent. The closest translation is something like 'a table reserved for regulars' or 'regular get-together.'
The Wen, the Olympics and the Baron
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It all seemed incurably stained to begin with, though it began as an experiment made for moulding the human character. When looking at the record of the Olympics, a negative image emerges...
Dividing day at the Grand-Hotel du Cap-Ferrat | Loren Stephens
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Norman, my soon to be ex-husband, and I were sitting at opposite ends of the sofa like two prize fighters before a match...
Starbucks in the University Library | Cooper Sy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Cooper Sy
Comprehending Kings | Lee Matthew Goldberg
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Lee Matthew Goldberg
How Hsi-wei Became a Vagabond | Robert Wexelblatt
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Robert Wexelblatt
Privatising Passports | Anton Baer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A few years ago I flew back to Canada after many years in Europe. At Vancouver customs I noticed that the crowds were almost entirely Asian, and they all held out passports just like mine: dark blue, with elegant gold lettering that spelled out CANADA...
Horror and the Essential Conquest of Fear | Lindsey Walker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When I watch horror today, I come to the films with a new set of experiences and from a different place than I did as a kid. When I watch Pet Sematary for the tenth time, it doesn't bother me that Gage gets put down at the end; that's his sleep, his release. What bothers me now are the adult fears, its representations of solitude, shame, and loss...
The Kentucky Derby | Brian Conlon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There is no place in the world like Churchill Downs on Derby Day. Yes, of course, strictly speaking, there is no place in the world just like any other on any given day...
What is Inequality and How it Was Created | Kent Flannery and Joyce Marcus
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
How did our ancestors convert the original level playing field to a stratified society?
A Satisfying Life | John Lachs
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The love affair of Western society with technology has reinforced its tendency to optimism. We believe that unhappiness is a curable condition and the application of intelligence will solve every problem...
Peace, Judaism, and Politics | Alick Isaacs
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The inspiration to write 'A Prophetic Peace' came from my experiences as a soldier in the Second Lebanon War fought between Israel and the Hezbollah in the summer of 2006...
A Liberal World Order in Crisis | Georg Sørensen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Georg Sorensen on the 'Liberal World Order'
Corruption and Economic Growth in China | Andrew Wedeman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The three-decade old Chinese economic 'miracle' apparently has a dark side, one which seems to contradict current economic orthodoxy which posits that rising corruption depresses growth rates and slows development...
Why We Hate Politics, But Love Democracy | Steven Bilakovics
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Steven Bilakovics: Democratic politics, the citizen's practice of arguing together, comes in turn to seem oddly out of place in democratic society.
Making Sense of the Republican American Presidential Primary | Stanley A. Renshon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Stanley A. Renshon on the politics and policies of the United States
Serbia’s New President: A Nationalist, Yes, but a Democrat Too | Mladen Joksic and Marlene Spoerri
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Serbia is headed down the drain-again. Or so the analysts would have you believe. The surprising defeat of Serbia's Western-oriented, pro-reformist President Boris Tadic (47.31%), by the former arch nationalist, Tomislav Nikolic (49.54%) in the presidential elections held on May 20, set forth the predictable tsunami of doom and gloom scenarios...
Power Rules: How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Leslie Gelb: Foreign policy is commonsense, not rocket science.
The Soul of Achilles | Michael Davis
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Excerpted from 'The Souls of the Greeks: An Inquiry' by Michael Davis
On the Importance of the Ottoman Straits | Sean McMeekin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Russian Origins of the First World War
What Happened in Warsaw | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On Moshe Arens's 'Flags Over the Warsaw Ghetto'
Relativism, Perspectivism and Citizen Kane | Daniel Shaw
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Excerpt from 'Morality and the Movies: Reading Ethics Through Film'
Cranach, Luther, and the Protestant Reformation | Steven Ozment
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Cranach, after God, became Luther's 'senior adviser' in the unfolding of the Protestant Reformation...
Remembering Paul Simon’s Graceland | Binoy Kampmark
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It was an album that spawned theses in paper churning departments. It infuriated, puzzled and confused...
The Wizard of Oz Remains a Symbol Of Social Progress | Leigh Donaldson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Today, Oz is known by practically everyone in the world, but only a rare person is familiar with the artists who wrote its great songs...
Pale Horse, Pale Rider: The Selected Stories of Katherine Anne Porter
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Malcolm Forbes on Katherine Anne Porter's work
Starbucks in the University Library | Cooper Sy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Cooper Sy
Power Shifts in the 21st Century | Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Foreign and domestic policy become difficult to disentangle. Contrary to the current conventional wisdom about the advantages of authoritarian states, American soft power and its open society may actually give the country new power advantages in the twenty-first century.
Tocqueville’s Democracy in America | Leo Damrosch
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Alexis de Tocqueville is often quoted as a sort of Olympian oracle, lofty and impersonal...
Leo Strauss's Political Philosophy and Its Legacy | Paul Gottfried
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
German Jewish refugee Leo Strauss (1899-1973) exercised as much influence on his discipline and on American society as any other political thinker in the second half of the twentieth century...
Isaiah Berlin on Soviet Culture | Strobe Talbott
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Isaiah Berlin believed that ideas matter, not just as products of the intellect but as producers of systems, guides to overnance, shapers of policy, inspirations of culture and engines of history...
Isaiah Berlin's Essays on Soviet Culture | Henry Hardy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Henry Hardy's introduction to the Isiah Berlins's essays on the culture in Soviet Union
Troubled Times: Responses from the Ecological Left | Andrew Gibson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A review of 'Filthy Lucre: Economics for People Who Hate Capitalism' and 'Plenitude: The Economics of True Wealth'
The compatibility of science and religion | Robert J Asher
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many scientists are religious, and consider their beliefs to be entirely rational...
In Praise of Reason | Michael P. Lynch
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Imagine that a mysteriously powerful scientist offers you choice between two doors...
Guilt | Katherine Mansfield's 'The Garden Party'
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In a paper I wrote on Katherine Mansfield's 'The Garden Party,' I think in the late-nineties, I started by presenting, in brief, the following facts and numbers...
Female Empowerment in Uganda | Kevin O'Donovan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Coaching female empowerment to the field in the aftermath of Joseph Kony
Walking and Bicycling to Health | Steven Hill
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
During a recent trip across western Europe by train, my frequent companions were the many strangers, visible outside my train window, who could be seen traversing a vast network of bike paths and walking trails that crisscross the cities and countryside. Europeans of all ages, including seniors, can be seen pedaling from home to town and back again with their daily bread in their handlebar baskets...
O Marieville: A Mosaic of Montreal's Past and Present
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy on Montreal's past and present
On Robert Byron's "'The Station" | John M. Edwards
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Robert Byron’s 'The Road to Oxiana' was a smashing success, but was his other great book on The Great Game, the severely neglected 'lost' classic 'The Station,' in some ways even better?
Miss America Fates and Fortunes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The fates and the fortunes of Miss America winners from 1921 to 2012. Painting: 'Reclamation' by Brat Kunkle
Mad Men: Dark Shadows
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Matt Domino's Mad Men Reviews
Opportunity Cost | Kelly Stanton
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Kelly Fordon.
The Complex Systems | Decoding the organizing principles of economy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It sounds paradoxical, but today it appears that we understand more about the universe than our society...
The Sources of Stable Peace | Charles A. Kupchan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The role of diplomacy in international relations
Totalitarianism and Political Religion | A. James Gregor
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In his Essays Moral, Literary, and Political, David Hume argued that it is not possible for a competitive political party to "support itself without a philosophical or speculative system of principles annexed to its political or practical one..."
Barack Obama's personality: A psychological analysis | Stanley A. Renshon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Stanley A. Renshon’s psychological portrait of the President Barack Obama and the sources of his policy of redemption.
The origins and future of war | Jack S. Levy and William R. Thompson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On the origins, escalation and future of war.
Jared Loughner and American Violence | Zach Dorfman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On the night of January 7th, 2011, Jared Lee Loughner, twenty-two, checked into a Motel 6 in Tucson, Arizona. He then dropped off a roll of film containing pictures of himself in a red g-string, a gun to his bare ass. Loughner retrieved these photos that same night...
English: The Last Lingua Franca? | Nicholas Ostler
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The End of English as World Language?
The Brain and the Meaning of Life | Paul Thagard
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An optimistic theory of natural mind
The French celebrate… Americans? | Steven Hill
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Are the French really so anti-American?
French Intellectuals, the Cultural Revolution, and the Legacy of the 1960s | Richard Wolin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Richard Wolin on his book The Wind from the East
The EU, European Identity, and the Future of Europe | Neil Fligstein
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Neil Fligstein on the future of European political integration.
Puritans, Pilgrims, and a City on a Hill | Michael P. Winship
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Michael P. Winship on the sources of American republicanism.
A Reportage from Post-Soviet Russia | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy's reportages from post-communist Russia
Post-Soviet Russia: Chechens, KGB, Khodorkovsky... | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
David Levy's reportages from post-communist Russia
Lyonel Feininger: From Manhattan to the Bauhaus | Patrick Kennedy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For an exhibition like Lyonel Feininger: From Manhattan to the Bauhaus, the greatest danger isn't incoherence, or sprawl, or over-ambition. It's that everything might cohere a little too methodically. In this eighty or so years of artistic activity--an eighty years that included forays into painting, cartooning, photography, musical composition, and toy design--Feininger displayed a versatility and adaptability that even the most involved showcase might not effectively capture...
Mad Men: Signal 30 | Matt Domino
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Matt Domino's Mad Men Reviews - Episode 4
Beverly Akerman on The Meaning Of Children and the writing life
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I'd always thought I'd be a writer some day...
Mark Lavorato on Believing Cedric
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As individuals, we make up our own abridged histories. When at a pub or a dinner party, we have a kind of condensed bio that we like to spout off when meeting new people, a single sentence we utter in order to quickly and efficiently convey our story...
The Church in Montreal Today | Mark Lavorato
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
50 years after the Quiet Revolution. Photo Essays by Mark Lavorato
Why Nations Fail | Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
If you start in the city center of Nogales Santa Cruz and walk south for a while, at some point you see houses become much more run down, streets turn decrepit. You have crossed the Mexican border into Nogales, Sonora. Though the two cities are made of the same cloth and were once united, now there are sharp differences between the two...
Ideologies and International Relations | Mark L. Haas
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ideologies consistently had major effects on leaders' core international perceptions and policies. Most importantly, ideologies went a long way toward determining leaders' understandings of which states were likely to threaten and which states were likely to support their core domestic and international interests. Ideologies, in short, to a great extent determined leaders' perceptions of likely enemies and allies...
The Gulf Regional System and the Arab Spring | F. Gregory Gause, III
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The eyes of the world have rightly been focused since the beginning of 2011 on the popular upheavals in the Arab world. Leaders have been deposed in three Arab countries, very possibly in a fourth (Yemen, where President Ali Abdallah Saleh has resigned but remains in the country) and Bashar al-Asad hangs on against the most serious challenge to his family's rule since it began in 1970...
Globalization, Democracy and World Economy | by Dani Rodrik
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The world has seen globalization collapse once already. The gold standard era–with its free trade and free capital mobility–came to an abrupt end in 1914 and could not be resuscitated after World War I. Could we witness a similar global economic breakdown in the years to come?...
The Capitalist Dynamics and Progress | Joyce Appleby
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Where the Capitalist Dynamic has Brought Us...
The Future of the Left | James Cronin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When the “great recession” hit in September, 2008, it seemed that an era had ended. Since the 1980s, if not before, a pro-market consensus had governed economic policy-making and constrained political options in the advanced countries. For three decades serious politics had been about relying upon markets rather than the state to generate growth and, to that end, extending the reach and remit of market forces...
On Re-Forming Capitalism | Wolfgang Streeck
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My book recounts the transformation of the German political economy after the end of the postwar growth period in the 1970s...
The Political Collapse That Preceded the Economic Collapse | Steven Hill
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Excerpt from the Introduction to "10 Steps to Repair American Democracy: A More Perfect Union, 2012 Election Edition" by Steven Hill
Lincoln and Christian Politics | Grant N. Havers
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Every Lincoln scholar is familiar with the perhaps apocryphal story told by Henry Champion Deming, a member of the Connecticut Congress, about the president's understanding of Christianity...
Les Nouveaux Cavaliers de l'Apocalypse | Jean-Pierre Filiu
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Depuis que Mahmoud Ahmadinejad a été élu président de la République islamique d'Iran, en juin 2005, ses provocations fort peu diplomatiques ont défrayé la chronique internationale. Sa volonté d'effacer Israël de la carte du monde ou son encouragement au programme nucléaire ont nourri les angoisses légitimes et les spéculations stratégiques...
The Korean War and American Policy in East Asia | Bruce Cumings
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Bruce Cumings on his books "The Korean War: A History" and "Dominion from Sea to Sea: Pacific Ascendancy and American Power"
Soviet Espionage in Canada, the Fred Rose Affair | David Levy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In the summer of 1943 Fred Rose, a candidate for the Labour Progressive Party, a communist party alias, was elected to the Canadian parliament in a by election in the federal constituency of Cartier, back then a working class district in the heart of Montreal...
Russia’s presidential election: Democracy, tradition and history | Hamid Elyassi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Russia's 2012 presidential election follows the controversial parliamentary poll in December last year which resulted in the declared victory of the ruling United Russia party, albeit with a reduced majority. The December election was notable not for its largely predictable outcome, but for the eruption of the mini Arab-Spring style protest against alleged vote rigging and the reactions that followed...
The Canadian Pivot to China? | Kevin Blachford
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ever since Goldman Sach's coined the term BRICS to describe the rising economic power of Brazil, Russia, India and China, it has been clear that the twenty-first century will see a radical redistribution of power from the West to the rest of the world, who are not only catching up in terms of development, but may well soon overtake the West...
Reason and Experience in the Age of Descartes | Christopher Braider
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Christopher Braider: "The Matter of Mind: Reason and Experience in the Age of Descartes" challenges the universal presumption that the decisive turning point in early modern Western literary and intellectual culture was what Richard Rorty has called the dualist ‘invention of the mind.' ...
Red Road as an Experience of the Sense of Cinema | Beste Alpay
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Red Road is a movie which uses visuality to create the sensation of touch and most of the time leads the viewer to associate the visual material with sensations of the “haptic”...
Kollontai Fashion Collection | Gabrielle Tousignant
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Interview with fashion designer Gabrielle Tousignant
Street Photography by Mark Lavorato
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Photography
North Korea's Totalitarian Succession | by Bruce Cumings
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When Kim Jong Il died on December 17th, I was lucky to be in Singapore. That way I could watch from a salutary distance the froth and drivel that passed for expert American commentary: How can his callow son expect to grapple with octogenarian leaders in the powerful military—won't there be a coup?
China, the United States, and Power Balancing in East Asia | Steve Chan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Steve Chan: If balance-of-power theory is correct, one should see China's neighbors and other major powers reacting to its rise in the manner predicted. They have not so far, thus presenting an enigma to realism.
Casualties of Credit | Carl Wennerlind
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1696, Sir Isaac Newton left Cambridge for London, putting his scientific and alchemical pursuits temporarily on hold to assume the position of Warden of the Royal Mint. His main responsibility was to investigate and prosecute crimes against the English currency...
How Intelligence Happens | John Duncan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Perhaps humanity is overly narcissistic, but few problems are so fascinating to us as our own, complex and intelligent minds. For over a century, debates have raged over so-called intelligence tests, used in schools, in armies, and in the offices of clinical psychologists—what do such tests mean? what do they miss? can a single score capture any of the richness of human nature and talent?...
Cultural Evolution | Alex Mesoudi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Charles Darwin is rightly celebrated for providing, in The Origin of Species, the first workable scientific theory to explain the stunning diversity and complexity of life on earth...
Worldmodels | Uriah Kriegel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
‘The aim of philosophy,' the great American philosopher Wilfred Sellars once wrote, ‘is to understand how things in the broadest possible sense of the term hang together in the broadest possible sense of the term.'...
A Regional Christ: the Folk Saint Gaucho Gil | Eric Maroney
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
All over Argentina, his small shrines can be found along roadsides. They are often ramshackle, little more than a crate containing a statue. Sometimes they are painted red or festooned with red ribbons and cloth...
Betty Shamieh | An Interview
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Betty Shamieh: Being connected to two cultures, particularly two cultures that are sometimes at war, gives one insight into what is common about all human beings...
How and Why I Wrote "YOU comma Idiot" | Doug Harris
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
"I wrote a book for myself to read. One I would be sure to finish. Now what's left to be seen is whether others feel the same way."
Keith Miller's "Welcome to Pine Hill" | by Lorry Ruppard
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Interview with Keith Miller
DUY Collection | Interview with fashion designer Duy Nguyen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Interview with Montreal's fashion designer Duy Nguyen
Jack's Room | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My three brothers, eighteen, sixteen, and fourteen years my senior, lived away from home for most of my childhood. Our interaction was limited to their week-end visits to our parents' house, or the occasional longer stay when they would reoccupy their rooms during intervals between schools or apartments...
In Wonderland | Bernard Quetchenbach
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In 1991, I left graduate school to take a position teaching in the English department at Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming, a small agricultural town in the Bighorn Basin east of Yellowstone National Park...
"I’ll find you a wheelbarrow" | Alan Gratias
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Camp Nominingue is a residential wilderness camp in the Laurentians, four hours north of Montreal. Founded in 1925 by the Van Wagner family, and set on 400 acres on the shores of Lac Nominingue, the summer camp is based on the belief that the self-esteem of young boys grows the longer they live in tents and go on canoe trips...
The Herb: Selected Poems by Aisa Alyasiri | by Salih J. Altoma
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A rare, if not unique, pastoral voice in contemporary Iraqi Arabic poetry, Aisa Alyasiri (residing currently in Canada) was born in 1942 in a village near the city of Amarah in southern Iraq...
Poetry | Steven Mayoff
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry by Steven Mayoff
From the archives: Is America the New Rome? | T.S.Tsonchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On he similarities between the rise of the American state and power and the upsurge of Roman Republic
Phoebe and Edgar in the Garden of America | Anna Kaehler
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There's an elderberry tree between my house and Edgar's house, in the wash filled with desert grass...
An Arts Student’s Manifesto | Lucy Cameron
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My friends and classmates: You may ask yourselves why I have gathered you here today. It has not been long since we last convened; indeed we met only yesterday on the sixteenth of November, a day in many ways like any other...
The Couple | Robin Tung
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There was always a feeling of surprise, even after six months, at the diminutive size of the office...
A Swim | Matt Domino
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The wedding was over, so Nick and Stephen decided to stop at the ravine. Nick had heard about it while he was working on a house outside of Waterbury...
The Character of Russia | David Satter
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For centuries, the Russian traveler, crossing the border, felt an inexplicable lightness, as if an unseen burden had been lifted from his shoulders...
The Myth of Putin the State Builder | Brian D. Taylor:
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Politics have returned to Russia, with a vengeance. The contested December 2011 parliamentary elections, which were supposed to be an inconsequential stepping stone on Vladimir Putin's triumphant return to the presidency and the Kremlin, instead gave birth to a serious challenge to the ruling regime...
Russian Politics Today | Richard Sakwa
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Few of the modernisation tasks facing Vladimir Putin when he came to power in 2000 have been resolved. Indeed, many of the challenges facing the country after Stalin's death in 1953 still remain on the agenda...
Lars T. Lih on "Soviet Fates and Lost Alternatives"
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
"Truth in reviewing: Steve Cohen was my teacher in graduate school at Princeton and has remained a friend ever since. I don't think, however, that this is the reason I mostly agree with his version of events. I may disagree with this or that interpretation of particular events, but overall this is one of the first books I would put into the hands of someone who wanted to get a good sense of what the Soviet Union was all about."
Arab Spring, Islam and Democracy | Hamid Elyassi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The ongoing process of revolutionary change in the Middle East and North Africa may not have spent all its potential force yet, but even this far, it has altered the world attitude to the region and its political folk culture. In particular, the outcome of the uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya seem to have dented the claim that the popular alternative to regional dictatorships has to be Islamic fundamentalist regimes bent on suicide bombing the West and depriving the indigenous intelligentsia of the few personal freedoms they enjoy. The notion, still a favourite line of defence of some of the remaining regional dictators, is in fact a relatively recent invention of Islamic extremists who contend that “true Islam” is inherently incompatible with democratic values and institutions...
Alaa Al Aswany’s On the State of Egypt, a Year After the Revolution | Maurice Chammah
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I first saw Alaa Al Aswany's On the State of Egypt sitting in a bookstore in the U.S. in July 2011. The ‘revolution,' as we were still calling it—‘uprisings' is the more popular term now —was only six months old...
Winter Postcards from the Kazakh steppe | David Mould
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
TKazakhstan's capital Astana is renowned for its futuristic and eclectic (or ostentatious and jumbled, depending on one's aesthetic) architecture. It also has a more dubious distinction: it's the second coldest capital city in the world. Other cities in northern Kazakhstan are just as chilly. With temperatures often below minus 30 Celsius, David Mould, who teaches media studies at Ohio University, had plenty of time to reflect on the coldest winter of his life during his Fulbright Fellowship in Kazakhstan...
Central Asia Frequent Flyer | David Mould
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When the Soviet Union broke up 20 years ago, its national airline Aeroflot suffered the same fate. From Baku to Bishkek, Tallinn to Tashkent, the governments of cash-strapped new republics seized the aircraft sitting on the tarmac, repainted them in the new national colors and hoped they could round up enough spare parts to keep them flying...
The Science of Empathy and How We Connect with Others | Marco Iacoboni
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Imagine you are out and about, perhaps doing some shopping, or planning an evening at the movies with friends. Lots of people are around you, coming and going, all busy with their own plans. You look at them, they look at you. Where do you think they are looking, when they look at you?..
Choice and the Free Market | by Kent Greenfield
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
We may be quite aware of various ways we are constrained in life–biology, social norms, authority–but one area we are told embodies robust, unlimited choice is the free market...
The Promise of Thrift | Joshua J. Yates
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Until recently, the word "thrift" had largely disappeared from the active vocabulary of most Americans. Like chastity and temperance, thrift was well on its way to becoming a virtue relic of a bygone era...
Marx and Alienation | Sean Sayers
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Alienation is a pervasive but puzzling feature of modern life. It is one of the few theoretical terms from Marxism that has entered into ordinary language...
States of War | David William Bates
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
States of War addresses one of the most pressing concerns of modern democratic states: how to reconcile the foundational drive to defend the nation with the principles of law and civic rights?..
Evolution and the Rational Mind | by Ronald de Sousa
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Humans, it has been said since Aristotle, are rational animals. Those who scoff at the phrase misunderstand it as contrasting with irrationality. But the proper contrast is with the non- rational, or arational. Inanimate objects are arational, because it makes no sense to tax them with irrationality. Humans are rational precisely because we are capable of irrationality...
The Evolution of Ethics | by Philip Kitcher
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Philip Kitcher: "We became fully human when we were able to find ways of inhibiting tendencies to socially disruptive action, ways of reinforcing our altruistic capacities..."
Rationality and Religious Commitment | Robert Audi
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Why should there be yet another book in the philosophy of religion, and why should I in particular write one? Rationality and Religious Commitment has grown from a great deal of my work on both these topics...
The Stoics and the Epicureans on Friendship, Sex, and Love | Richard Kreitner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ancient philosophy - especially after Aristotle - largely focused on how to achieve self-sufficiency on the one hand, and peace of mind on the other; it thus became fundamentally therapeutic, in nature and goal...
The Essay | John Pahle
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The essay is perhaps the most accessible and democratic of all forms of writing. All it requires is a thesis and a discussion; the rest is up to the authors to present creatively their ideas and arguments...
Russia’s parliamentary elections | M. Steven Fish
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Russia's parliamentary elections conform to well-established patterns of arbitrary exclusion of opposition candidates and intimidation and manipulation of opposition forces. Given the exclusion, cooptation, and intimidation of oppositionists in Russia, many people who might be inclined to compete for office in more open polities simply do not choose to do so in Russia. Thus, we cannot know for sure who would have contested these elections if Russia had a more open system...
Republican Presidential Candidates’ Iranimania | James DeFronzo
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In U.S. presidential politics the “threat” of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's Iran has emerged as a potent political issue comparable to Saddam Hussein's Iraq and “weapons of mass destruction” (WMD ) in the period leading up to the invasion of Iraq in March 2003...
Iranian Politics: Superstition as Ideology | Ali Rahnema
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ali Rahnema on his new book "Superstition as Ideology in Iranian Politics: From Majlesi to Ahmadinejad": "Majlesism as a religio-political ideology is based on two axial premises. First, that the human mind is defective and subsequently incapable of addressing and resolving everyday problems. Second, that in the absence of the common folk's ability to make correct and worthy decisions, society requires the leadership of a King and/or of a religious jurist with a connection to the hidden world..."
Photography and Jazz | Benjamin Cawthra
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The music came first, then the photographs. But what images they are: a sculptural Dexter Gordon bathed in cigarette smoke...
Michelangelo | by William E. Wallace
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Michelangelo Buonarroti is universally recognized to be among the greatest artists of all time...
The Gospel of Thomas and Christian Origins | André Gagné
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
André Gagné: "The Gospel of Thomas is not a “heretical” writing and should not be placed under the modern category of Gnosticism. Like the traditional New Testament writings, Thomas is also concerned with the reception and transmission of the words and teachings of Jesus..."
Gravity’s Ghost | Harry Collins
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
How do scientists decide they have discovered something? Gravity's Ghost is a detective story about a potential discovery called 'the Equinox Event'. At the same time, it's an investigation of the nature of science...
Capitalism and Crisis | James Fulcher
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
One way or another capitalism will continue on its crisis-prone way, the solution to one crisis begetting another. There is no final crisis and no final solution to crisis...
Max Frisch: One Hundred Years On | Malcolm Forbes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
One hundred years ago Max Frisch was born in Zurich. He died twenty years ago in the same city. In between he got out and travelled widely, and in 1952 lived in the US and Mexico on a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. His journeying shaped his writing, both novels and plays, providing exotic settings but also locales deliberately far removed from his birthplace...
Death | Todd May
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Each of us will die. Sooner or later, each of you reading this words, as well as I who write them, will be dead. This fact about us affects our lives perhaps more profoundly than any other fact about us...
Gustav Klimt: The Universe in a Kiss | by Stephanie Ann Harper
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I have never seen a painting as tender and vibrant as Gustav Klimt's oil on canvas painting, “The Kiss.” To me, “The Kiss,” circa 1907-08, enacts a perfect transaction between two people with hearts so full of love that the world around them bursts in flamboyant, colorful life...
A Cooperative Species | Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Cooperation was prominent among the suite of behaviors that marked the emergence of behaviorally modern humans in Africa...
The Last Superstition | Edward Feser
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The central contention of the “New Atheism” of Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris, and Christopher Hitchens is that there has for several centuries been a war between science and religion...
On Being Singular | Gerald L. Bruns
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Ceasing to be human is a fugitive event; it can't be captured by a single narrative or conceptual context. Perhaps the proper way to pursue the matter is by way of historical inquiries into the forms and occasions of its appearance...
Portraits and Persons | Cynthia Freeland
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As a philosopher I ask different questions about portraits than art historians...
New York, Film, and the Reconception of the World | Stanley Corkin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I began researching Starring New York before I finished my prior book, Cowboys as Cold Warriors. In that book I considered a group of film westerns in their relationships to U. S. Cold War culture and politics from the late 1940s to the early 1960s. As I developed that project, I saw how those narratives...
E.P. Taylor and How Monopoly Took Over a Sport | Rodney Dubey
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The summer of 2011 marked 20 years since Dance Smartly, a magnificent Canadian 3-yr-old filly, cake-walked down the home stretch of Woodbine racetrack in Toronto...
The Last Lion | B. Newmark
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by B. Newmark
Guelph in the Afternoon | Anton Baer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
To tell the truth. To remain within nodding distance of the facts, which run away from you effortlessly. To drive after them living people, who are much more unwilling and in the end disappointing than imaginary ones, who can show up anywhere, adopt any pose, pull off speeches of shattering brevity, and do not lie to you...
The First Heart Heartbreak | Catherine Uroff
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My mother had her favorites: dark chocolate, lightly salted cashews, Joyce Carol Oates, Neil Diamond, silver jewelry, Shalimar perfume, black coffee, red wine, the Chicago Cubs...
Poetry | Lauren Nicole Nixon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry by L.N.Nixon
Borges and Calvino Race for Blood Sausage | David Butler
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On a hot summer day in 1967, the blind and infirm Jorge Luis Borges challenged his healthier and much younger protégé, Italo Calvino...
I was 16… | Sean Christopher Lewis
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I was 16 in 1994. I remember I had a crush on a girl at my high school named Stacy...
Poets’ Corner | Louise Carson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
First let me tell you what I'm not referring to. I'm not referring to that section of the South Transept of Westminster Abbey where poets, playwrights and writers from Chaucer to Hughes are buried or commemorated under plaques or white marble busts...
Giant corporations: a problem of democracy | Colin Crouch
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The viability of western democracy is now being put to a severe test: can the economic crisis be tackled in a way that recognizes the situation of the great majority of the population, or must the interests of the banks who caused the crisis in the first place through their irresponsible use of secondary markets always be privileged?...
Why People Become Poor and How They Escape Poverty | Anirudh Krishna
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Is it possible to prevent or forestall poverty?
The Institutional Revolution | Douglas W. Allen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Book review
Iraqi Communism Before Saddam | Johan Franzén
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
To many people hearing the phrase Middle East politics, and in particular Iraqi politics, conjures up images of sectarian strife, tribal and clan loyalties, and persecution of ethnic minorities...
Tunisia’s Success Heralds a Testing Time for Egypt | Gillian Kennedy
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Tunisians made history on October 23rd this year by taking part in the regions first free and fair elections that were held in the backdrop of the Arab Spring...
Inner Rhythm | Michael Burns
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Gabriel Hunt filched one of the stuffed grape leaves his wife, Caroline, had made for the dinner-dance tonight...
The Stranger in the Snow | Nels Hanson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
After Jodie Johnston left Nevada with Johnny on his bus, she called from hotels the mornings after shows, excited and eager to report...
The Inuit Art of Ruben Anton Komangapik
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
“When I'm lost in my art – I'm at home,” says Ruben Anton Komangapik, contemporary Inuit artist...
Art and Process with Noa Kaplan | Robin Tung
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Robin Tung interview with the media artist and designer Noa Kaplan
Coco Chanel Biography
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Even people with little interest in high fashion know the name Chanel—a name synonymous with sophistication and glamour...
On Art for Art's Sake | R. Joseph Capet
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
'Art for art's sake' is a much misunderstood phrase. In the public imagination it is invariably the oriflamme of Decadents and Aesthetes...
Walter Benjamin's Arcades Project
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A Review on Susan Buck Morss' “The Dialectics of Seeing: Walter Benjamin and the Arcades Project”
UN Peacekeeping Operations: Privatising the Peace | Julian Reid
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
For as long as humans have fought wars, there have been those willing to kill, and to risk their lives, for profit...
On Empathy and the Origins of Cruelty | Simon Baron-Cohen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When we try to explain acts of human cruelty, there is no scientific value in the term 'evil' but there is scientific value in using the term 'empathy erosion'...
Human Rights in History | Samuel Moyn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Last Utopia assesses how deeply rooted in history the notion of “international human rights” is...
Scientific Explanation | Michael Strevens
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Humanity's single greatest achievement is, perhaps, to understand something about the way that the world really works...
Libya: The Future of a Revolution | James DeFronzo
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Although revolutionary forces succeeded in capturing the main urban centers of Libya and killing Muammar Gaddafi, the ultimate outcome of the civil war is far from certain. Is conflict really at an end?
How News Photos Move the Public | Barbie Zelizer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Death has long been seen as the ultimate equalizer, yet its depiction in the news takes shape across unequal parameters...
Poetry | William Lychack
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry by William Lychack
Bashar al-Asad is not going to sign his own death warrant | Nikolaos van Dam
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Bashar al-Asad is not going to sign his own death warrant. A scenario of reconciliation South African style does not seem to be possible...
Dignity and Confict | Donna Hicks
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
While we all have a deep and abiding desire to be treated well and to be recognized as worthy, our lack of awareness and understanding of the many ways we routinely violate each other's dignity is wreaking havoc on our lives and our relationships...
The Model in the Mirror of Art | Wendy Steiner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Any creation story is a story about models, for as King Lear reminds us, “Nothing can come of nothing..."
How economists are abusing the past | Francesco Boldizzoni
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Since the 1970s, economics has entered a phase of aggression toward the other social sciences that is defined by its own creators as “economic imperialism..."
What is Conservatism | Kieron O'Hara
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Defining conservatism is surprisingly hard...
Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise and the Birth of Secularism | Steven Nadler
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Theological-Political Treatise was regarded by Spinoza's contemporaries as the most dangerous book ever published...
Psychology and Catholicism | Robert Kugelmann
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Relationships between sciences and religions are a thorny issue in our day...
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism | Richard Swedberg
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism by Max Weber is one of the world's most famous studies in social science, competing for the first place with works such as Capital by Karl Marx and Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville...
Merleau-Ponty and Proust: Travel and Habit | Richard Kreitner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Travel and Habit in Merleau-Ponty and Proust
Why We See So Well | Lynne A. Isbell
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
How did we get to the point where we miss the smells that a dog experiences but we see the rest of life in fine, colorful detail and depth?...
We Can’t All Be Gods | William Farrant
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When my best friend Nigel and I were fourteen we started a band. Neither of us played a musical instrument. So my father took promo photos for us instead...
Bobo | Kristen Brownell
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My brother Bobby and I looked up from the Nintendo. Our parents had given us the new game console for Christmas, and we had been glued to the television set ever since...
The Crisis of Capitalist Democracy | Richard A. Posner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My book will soon be two years old. But I don't think it has dated. What has happened since it was published is more of the same: more depression, more federal deficit, more political stalemate, more retreat from stimulus, more doubts about the Administration's handling of the crisis...
Freedom and the Laws of Nature | Steven Horst
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
One of the central projects of philosophy since the seventeenth century has been the attempt to reconcile our self-image as human beings with the picture of the world emerging from the natural sciences...
On the Origin of Stories | Brian Boyd
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Why do we love fiction?
Boredom: a Year’s History | Peter Toohey
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Yes you do. There's nothing left to believe in anymore. All is fiction. Somehow, we have to invent our own reality...
de Kooning | by Richard Shiff
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Even as he became a celebrity in the world of art, Willem de Kooning took pride in remaining an ordinary man, living (he liked to say) as he had when he was unknown and poor...
On Art and War and Terror | Alex Danchev
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
‘Poetry makes nothing happen,' said the poet W. H. Auden. How wrong he was...
Dialogues between Faith and Reason | John H. Smith
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Dialogues tells a story about how we got to where we are and hopes that the very telling of that story will help create a way for readers themselves to engage in reasonable dialogues about matters of faith...
Mindreading Animals | Robert W. Lurz
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Anyone who has ever lived with a dog or a cat (or any other intelligent social animal) will attest to the occasional uncanny feeling that one's pet knows what one is thinking...
Frans Hals | Walter Liedtke
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
As the Metropolitan Museum's curator of Dutch and Flemish paintings for the past thirty-one years I know the collection's 230 Dutch pictures (those dating ca. 1600-1800) as well as I would if they were hanging in my own house...
Why I Write | James Robison
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
I'm lonely but I dislike the company of other people and this puts me in a Hellbox...
Taking Movies Seriously | Daniel Shaw
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Film and Philosophy: Taking Movies Seriously is a brief overview of the history of philosophizing about film, which begins with a survey of early film theorists that had a philosophical bent (like Munsterberg and Eisenstein) and with profiles of the two most significant writers in the field so far, Stanley Cavell and Noel Carroll...
The Blindness of the Heart | M. Forbes on Julia Franck
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Prologues and epilogues, so often skimmed and scanned, demand closer inspection if the novel they frame purports or has proven to offer a longer, worthier shelf-life than its run-of-the-mill rivals...
Our Buick Stopped Here | Lee Matthew Goldberg
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Lee Matthew Goldberg (September, 2011)
Absent Sunshine | Sharon Siegel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poetry by Sharon Siegel
Caleb | Andrew MacQuarrie
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Andrew MacQuarrie
Simon Perchik | Poetry
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Poems by Simon Perchik
Norway’s Terror: The reminiscence of an Osloite | Lise K. Haugen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Mid-July in Oslo is generally a very quiet time, as much of the city's population leaves in order to embark on the summer holiday season...
Covered Bridges in the Quebec countryside | Ricky Kreitner
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The news stories that flooded front pages in the wake of Hurricane Irene late last month focused mostly on surging rivers, torn-up homes, downed trees, and the fate of New York City...
Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells us about Morality | Patricia S. Churchland
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Self-preservation is embodied in our brain's circuitry: we seek food when hungry, warmth when cold, and sex when lusty...
On Intelligence | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Although I recognized the concept of intelligence from an early age, it wasn't until high school that I realized that being smart meant more than getting good grades, and that different people could be smart in different ways...
Alfred Stieglitz: A Legacy of Light | Katherine Hoffman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In Stieglitz: A Beginning Light, Katherine Hoffman focused on the early years of Alfred Stieglitz's (1864–1946) career and his European roots...
The Clash of Ideas in World Politics | John M. Owen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Arab Awakening – the chain of rebellions and revolutions that have rocked the Arab world since last December – has riveted the attention of people the world over...
Age of Fracture | Daniel T. Rodgers
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In the midst of a heated political discussion, you may still hear it said that ideas don't matter...
Blind Spots | Max H. Bazerman and Ann E. Tenbrunsel
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
During the trying times that have followed the financial collapse of 2008, a long list of culprits has been blamed: homebuyers, mortgage lenders, bankers, Congress, and the Bush administration...
The welfare state and the rise of paternalism | Gilles Saint-Paul
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
We live in increasingly paternalistic societies; almost every day, somewhere in the developed world, a new law regulates what people can eat, drink, smoke, view, or read...
Kantian ethics or returning dignity to economics | Mark D. White
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A Review of Kantian Ethics and Economics: Autonomy, Dignity, and Character...
The Invention of Market Freedom | Eric MacGilvray
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Through most of human history the word “freedom” has been used to distinguish the members of a social and political elite from those classes of people – women, slaves, serfs, menial laborers, and foreigners – who do not enjoy their privileges or share their ethos...
Toward a Buddhist Politics of Freedom | Zach Dorfman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There is a central teaching in certain schools of Mahayana Buddhist metaphysics that all phenomena are shunya , or empty of inherent existence...
Neither Beast Nor God | Gilbert Meilaender
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The dignity of the human person
The Politics of Inequality in Russia | Thomas F. Remington
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Politics of Inequality in Russia is a study of the political processes underlieing the steady rise in inequality observed in Russia since the end of the Soviet regime...
Valdo goes to school | Alan Gratias
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My father was an enigma to everyone, his three children not excepted. Perhaps even to himself...
Something Tolstoyan | Brian Conlon
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
There was a man who beat his children. His name was Hans Holder...
Darwin’s Conjecture | Geoffrey M. Hodgson and Thorbjørn Knudsen
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Social scientists have been wary of applying Darwin's ideas. In our book "Darwin's Conjecture: The Search for General Principles of Social and Economic Evolution" (published 2010 by the University of Chicago Press) we argue that these misgivings are ungrounded...
Human Dignity | George Kateb
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
My book is a defense of human dignity. I mean that it is a defense of the equal status of individuals or persons vis-à-vis one another, and a defense of the superior stature of the human species vis-à-vis all others species...
Economic Origins of Roman Christianity | Robert B. Ekelund Jr. and Robert D. Tollison
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Roman Catholic Church, a principal world religion today in competition with other Christian faiths, had, by 1600, achieved dominance over huge swaths of Europe...
Why Jane Austen? | Rachel M. Brownstein
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Somewhere near the middle of "Why Jane Austen?", a book that combines literary and cultural criticism with recollections of teaching and travel and anecdotes about friends, neighbors, and strangers, I describe a gathering of Jane Austen fans I attended some years ago in England...
The inviolable King of Morocco | Mohammad I. Aslam
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
When falling for short term gains to impede long-term retributions happen to be the way forward...
Sickness and Health | Robert Wexelblatt
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many affairs of this life are fueled by money but one doesn't think about it unless the gas runs out...
The Current Crisis and the Essence of Capitalism | Thomas K. McCraw
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The worldwide economic downturn is no short-term blip but a full-fledged crisis of capitalism. Amid the din of commentary and political posturing, it's appropriate to return to first principles for a better understanding of the crisis. What are these principles? The answer requires a foray into history.
The Hebrew Republic | Eric Nelson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It has become commonplace to attribute the rise of modern political thought in the West to a process of “secularization.” In Medieval and Renaissance Europe, so the story goes, political thought was fundamentally Christian, an exercise in applied theology...
Evangelical Christians, Deists, and America’s Founding | Thomas S. Kidd
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
On New Year's Day of 1802, the Baptist evangelist John Leland delivered a remarkable gift to the White House: a 1,235 block of cheese...
Veteran's trip to Vietnam | Edward F. Palm
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Graham Greene was wrong about Vietnam. Not in the main, of course. The Quiet American (1955) still stands as not only the inaugural novel of the American intervention in Vietnam but also as a brilliant exposition on why we were destined to fail...
The writing life | Steven Mayoff
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The writing life of the Canadian author Steven Mayoff.
Great Lakes Foundry 1990 | James Robison
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by James Robison
Cookies | Lee Matthew Goldberg
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Short story by Lee Matthew Goldberg
Bombay Islam | Nile Green
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Along an alleyway amid a shanty town in the old port district of Bombay where in the nineteenth century the great steamship company P and O built its vast dockyard stands a shrine to an African holy man.
Western Samoa: 14 Degrees Southern Latitude | Brad Comann
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
After flying in a two-engine job from Pago Pago (that cheap t-shirt of a town) to Apia , capitol of Western Samoa, a local merchant showed me a series of postcards...
Design and Truth | Robert Grudin
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Perhaps the two most salient aspects of our humanity are our ability to communicate and our ability to design...
A Jane Austen Education | William Deresiewicz
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The idea that reading books can change your life has not been very fashionable this last century or so. It violates the high-modernist principle of art for art's sake, smacks of Victorian moralizing and self-improvement...
Richard Kearney's "Anatheism" | Fanny Howe
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Richard Kearney's Anatheism: Returning to God after God investigates the possibility of a God after God (ana-theos)...
Barbarous Philosophers | Christopher Coker
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
In his book The Invention Of Peace Michael Howard quotes the nineteenth century English jurist, Sir Henry Maine. “It is not peace which was natural and primitive and old, but rather war. War appears to be as old as mankind but peace is a modern invention… Not only is war to be seen everywhere but it is war more atrocious than we, with our ideas, can easily conceive...”
Scotland Goes Down the Quebec Road | Tom Gallagher
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Scotland is a heavily-urbanised but post-industrial nation which voluntarily renounced its status as an independent nation-state to merge with its larger and more powerful southern neighbour England in 1707...
Demystifying Syria | Fred H. Lawson
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Syria remains poorly understood, despite the pivotal role it plays in the contemporary Middle East...
Origins of Political Extremism | Manus I. Midlarsky
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Political extremism is one of the most pernicious, destructive, and nihilistic forms of human expression. During the twentieth century, in excess of 100 million people had their lives taken from them as the result of extremist violence...
Radical Democracy and Political Theology | Jeffrey W. Robbins
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Unbeknownst to many, the world is undergoing a monumental change with regard to the understanding and practice of the proper relationship between religion and politics...
Adam Smith, radical and egalitarian | Iain McLean
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
A few years ago, I published a book with this title, responding to a question posed by Gordon Brown...
The Origins of Business, Money, and Markets | Keith Roberts
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Prior to The Origins of Business, Money, and Markets, nobody has ever described how business, the practice of selling at a profit, first began...
Fairness and the Social Contract | Peter Corning
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It seems that fairness is an idea whose time has come. True, some cynics view fairness as nothing more than a mask for self-interest. But the cynics are wrong...
Does Science Contradict Religion? | Alvin Plantinga
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Many people, these days, hold the opinion that religion and science conflict; in some deep way they are opposed to each other...
From Mao to Market | Robin Porter
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
It was late autumn 1968. Trudging through the snow along Rue de la Montagne in Montreal as the day drew to a close, I met up with an old family friend...
The Enlargement of Life | John Kekes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The title comes from Santayana, writing in Three Philosophical Poets of “a steady contemplation of all things in their order and worth. Such a contemplation is imaginative. No one can reach it who has not enlarged his mind and tamed his heart..."
What Literature Teaches Us about Emotion | Patrick Colm Hogan
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
An Essay on What Literature Teaches Us about Emotion.
Was America Founded as a Christian Nation? | John Fea
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Books: Was America Founded as a Christian Nation: A Historical Introduction.
Alienated and Engaged Muslims in the West | Justin Gest
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Book excerpt
Ernesto Sábato "The Tunnel" | Malcolm Forbes
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Book Review
A consideration on early 20th century American culture | Mike Mercer
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Essay by Mike Mercer
On Personality | Michael Milburn
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Essay by the poet Michael Milburn
Iran's Challenge in a time of Arab turmoil | A. Seitz and A.Cordesman
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Islamic Republic of Iran presents a wide range of challenges in a region that is already plagued by insecurity and conflict...
From Comrades to Enemies | Nicholas Khoo
December 15th, 2017, 04:36 PM
Sino-Soviet Rivalry and the Termination of the Sino-Vietnamese Alliance.